Studies new and old (Google eBook)

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Chapman and Hall, Ltd., 1888 - English literature - 254 pages
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Page 100 - The thing was my earliest attempt at 'poetry always dramatic in principle, and so many utterances of so many imaginary persons, not mine...
Page 17 - But whatsoever is the object of any man's appetite or desire, that is it which he for his part calleth good: and the object of his hate and aversion, evil; and of his contempt, vile and inconsiderable.
Page 74 - The hand that rounded Peter's dome And groined the aisles of Christian Rome Wrought in a sad sincerity; Himself from God he could not free; He builded better than he knew; The conscious stone to beauty grew.
Page 6 - CLINTON (RH)— A COMPENDIUM OF ENGLISH HISTORY, from the Earliest Times to AD 1872. With Copious Quotations on the Leading Events and the Constitutional History, together with Appendices. Post 8vo, 7s. 6d. COBDEN, RICHARD, LIFE OF. By the RIGHT HON. JOHN MORLEY, MP With Portrait.
Page 65 - Highest is present in the soul of man ; that the dread essence — which is not wisdom or love or beauty or power, but all in one, and each entirely, is that for which all things exist, and that by which they are ; that Spirit creates ; that behind Nature, throughout Nature, Spirit is present. One, and not compound, it does not act upon us from without — that is, in space and time — but spiritually, or through ourselves...
Page 9 - THE LETTERS OF CHARLES DICKENS. Edited by his Sister-in-Law and his Eldest Daughter. Two vols. uniform with " The Charles Dickens Edition " of his Works. Crown 8vo, 8s. THE LIFE OF CHARLES DICKENS— See
Page 195 - Cela se fait par figure et mouvement, car cela est vrai. Mais de dire quels, et composer la machine, cela est ridicule; car cela est inutile, et incertain, et pénible. Et quand cela serait vrai, nous n'estimons pas que toute la philosophie vaille une heure de peine.] XCII.
Page 83 - The book, if you would see anything in it, requires to be read in the clear, brown, twilight atmosphere in which it was written ; if opened in the sunshine, it is apt to look exceedingly like a volume of blank pages.
Page 80 - Indeed, we are but shadows — we are not endowed with real life, and all that seems most real about us is but the thinnest substance of a dream — till the heart is touched. That touch creates us — then we begin to be — thereby we are beings of reality, and inheritors of eternity.
Page 64 - The greatest delight which the fields and woods minister is the suggestion of an occult relation between man and the vegetable. I am not alone and unacknowledged. They nod to me, and I to them. The waving of the boughs in the storm is new to me and old. It takes me by surprise, and yet is not unknown. Its effect is like that of a higher thought or a better emotion coming over me, when I deemed I was thinking justly or doing right.

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