Globalization and the American Century

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 30, 2003 - Business & Economics - 343 pages
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Revolutionary improvements in technology combined with the leadership elite's enthusiasm for de-regulation of markets and free trade to fuel American-style globalization. The nation rose to economic power after the Spanish-American War, and won both world wars and the Cold war, after which America's power and cultural influence soared as business and financial interests pursued the long-term quest for global markets. But, the tragic events of September 2001 and the growing volatility of global finance, raised questions about whether the era of American-led globalization was sustainable, or vulnerable to catastrophic collapse.
  

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Contents

Toward a New Paradigm
1
Americanizing Britains World 18981913
9
Roots of the American Century
12
McKinley and the American Century
16
Made in America
18
Patent Protection
20
Strategy and Structures
21
Overseas Investments
22
Business Busted Diplomacy Destroyed 19291939
81
Defending Allies Developing Frontiers 19391946
104
Containing and Consuming 19471957
131
Transforming the World 19581973
156
Enduring the Crises 19731986
184
Freedom and Free Trade 19861995
207
Folding the Flag Globalization and the New Millennium
238
Statistical Tables
261

Big Power Diplomacy
26
American Cultural Influences
32
Globalization in War and Peace 19141920
38
Exporting the American Dream 19211929
59
Notes
271
Index
321
Copyright

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References to this book

Living with Globalization
Paul Hopper
No preview available - 2006
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About the author (2003)

Alfred E. Eckes, Jr., is Professor Emeritus of history at Ohio University.

Thomas W. Zeiler is professor and chair of the Department of History at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His books include Free Trade, Free World: The Advent of GATT and Dean Rusk: Defending the American Mission Abroad. He is the executive editor of the journal Diplomatic History and received the 2001 Stuart L. Bernath Lecture Prize from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations.