Union Street & Blow Your House Down

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1996 - Fiction - 416 pages
4 Reviews
Union Street, Pat Barker's first novel, concerns seven neighboring women near a factory in northeast England. Life for these women is trying: some of them are married to alcoholics, some are victims of abuse; one is old and near death, another is still a child but has the experience of an adult; all are struggling to survive. First published in 1982, it was made into the film Stanley & Iris by MGM in 1989, starring Robert DeNiro and Jane Fonda

Blow Your House Down, Barker's second novel, also portrays the lives of women in industrial England--but these women are prostitutes, living in a northern England city that is stalked by a vicious, Jack the Ripper-style serial killer who is singling out women with nowhere else to go.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - tina1969 - LibraryThing

Union Street Seven stories of seven womwn who live in Union Street. They all face challenges which include poverty, rape, drunken and abusive husbands and how are they going to survive. Blow Your ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dablackwood - LibraryThing

Union Street is the story of seven women who live near a factory in northern England. Each woman's situation is depicted in a separate chapter. The climate is bleak, the women are poor, and their ... Read full review

Contents

I
9
II
13
III
69
IV
102
V
131
VI
163
VII
202
VIII
212
XIX
289
XX
298
XXI
311
XXII
317
XXIII
319
XXIV
326
XXV
330
XXVI
339

IX
243
X
245
XI
247
XII
255
XIII
264
XIV
269
XV
273
XVI
276
XVII
278
XVIII
286
XXVII
341
XXVIII
350
XXIX
368
XXX
383
XXXI
385
XXXII
391
XXXIII
403
XXXIV
408
XXXV
412
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1996)

Pat Barker is one of England's most important contemporary novelists. She won the Booker Prize in 1995 for The Ghost Road, the final volume in her World War I trilogy that includes Regeneration and The Eye in the Door. Her latest novels are Another World and Border Crossing.

Bibliographic information