History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent, Volume 6 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
D. Appleton, 1884 - United States
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Contents

Ministry of Fox and the duke of Portland The king against the ministry
44
Believes American union impossible
50
Denmark The free city of Hamburg Portugal Russia
56
The debt to the army and half pay
62
The news of peace
68
THE AMERICAN ABMY AND ITS CIIIEF
70
Washingtons zeal for establishing a permanent union
76
Discharging the army Society of the Cincinnati
82
U ON TEE WAT TO A FEDERAL CONVENTION 17SS178T
89
In New York In Massachusetts
93
Hamilton on the defects of the confederation
99
Madison forced to retire by the rule of rotation
105
Congress declines to lead the way England compels union
111
History of the clause against slavery 289
118
The mint and American coinage The cost of the war
119
National measures of Virginia
122
Washington negotiates between Virginia and Maryland He refuses gifts
128
Grayson favors the prohibition of slavery
134
Bowdoin recommends a federal convention
140
The objections of Richard Henry Lee
144
The United States agree with France for a perfect reciprocity
152
Of the Baptists Of the convention of the Presbyterian church
158
Rapid increase of the Methodists Roman Catholics in the United States
164
The court and the legislature of Rhode Island in conflict
169
Inflexibility of Washington
175
His religion His hatred of war
181
Plan for a federal convention
187
New York retains the collecting of the revenue
193
Only five states appear Their extreme caution in their report
196
Expectation of the British ministry
202
Arrival of Washington Opening of the federal convention
208
Limited power of the delegates from Delaware
211
Extent of the federal legislative powers
217
The veto power
223
The requirement of an oath
229
Speech and plan of Hamilton
235
How his plan was received
237
Sherman for two branches
243
Suffrage in the first branch proportioned to population
249
The quorum Qualifications of electors
297
Madisons vote decides that the power shall not bo granted
303
Who are citizens? Fugitives from justice Fugitive slaves
309
Navy and militia Clause on the militia
313
North Carolina will join South Carolina and Georgia on the question
319
In South Carolina 92
322
Limit on the taxation of slaves
325
The convention votes for a single executive to be chosen by the legislature
331
And the vote to be counted by the senate
335
Election of the vicepresident
341
State of the president while on trial Judgment in case of impeachment
347
By the court By congress By the good sense of the land
353
Motion for a bill of rights defeated No title for the president 559
359
Of a university No state to trespass on the rights of another state
361
The constitution signed by every state Prophecy of Franklin
367
Is supported by New York Propositions of New Jersey
373
Plan for a second federal convention
379
Long debates upon it
382
Speech of iindley
388
The Connecticut convention Speeches of Ellsworth and Johnson
394
The convention wavering
401
THE CONSTITUTION IN NEW HAMPSHIRE MARYLAND AND SOUTH CAROLINA
409
Debate between Lowndes and Pinckney
415
The convention organized 211
419
CHAPTER V
421
Is replied to by Pendleton and Madison
427
Navigation of the Mississippi
433
THE CONSTITUTION
441
Bow the constitution is to be amended
447
Hamilton and a revenue tariff
453
Debate between Smith and Hamilton Lansing holds out
459
Opinions of Jefferson 406
461
In Virginia In South Carolina
467
Of John Adams 408
471
And of Amciica 174
474
Convention of North Carolina 460
500
Power to cut canals negatived 360
507
Of New Hampshire Rhode Island 169
543
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Page 472 - Heaven itself has ordained; and since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered as .deeply, perhaps as finally staked, on the experiment intrusted to the hands of the American people.
Page 126 - The Western States (I speak now from my own observation) stand as it were upon a pivot. The touch of a feather would turn them any way.
Page 292 - We, the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, do ordain, declare and establish, the following Constitution for the government of ourselves, and our posterity : ARTICLE I.
Page 218 - Confederation, and moreover to legislate in all cases to which the separate States are incompetent, or in which the harmony of the United States may be interrupted by the exercise of individual legislation ; to negative all laws passed by the several States contravening, in the opinion of the National Legislature, the Articles of Union, or any treaty subsisting under the authority of the Union...
Page 161 - They are now at full liberty simply to follow the Scriptures and the primitive church. And we judge it best that they should stand fast in that liberty wherewith God has so strangely made them free.
Page 148 - I have done nothing in the late Contest, but what I thought myself indispensably bound to do, by the Duty which I owed to my People. I will be very frank with you. I was the last to consent to the Separation, but the Separation having been made and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the Friendship of the United States as an independent Power.
Page 106 - With a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you ; I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Page 390 - Under the Articles of Confederation each State retained its sovereignty, freedom and independence, and every power, jurisdiction and right not expressly delegated to the United States.
Page 374 - That the said report, with the resolutions and letter accompanying the same, be transmitted to the several legislatures, in order to be submitted to a convention of delegates, chosen in each State by the people thereof, in conformity to the resolves of the convention made and provided in that case.
Page 158 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief...

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