An Essay Towards Attaining a True Idea of the Character and Reign of King Charles the First and the Causes of the Civil War: Extracted from and Delivered in the Very Words of Some of the Most Authentic and Celebrated Historians Viz. Clarendon, Whitelock, Burnet, Coke, Echard, Rapin, Tindal, Neal, &c (Google eBook)

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John Noon, 1748 - Great Britain - 158 pages
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Page 100 - Put not your trust in princes, nor in the sons of men, for in them there is no salvation."*** He was soon able, however, to collect his courage; and he prepared himself to suffer the fatal sentence.
Page 138 - If thou forbear to deliver them that are drawn unto death, and those that are ready to be slain ; if thou sayest, "Behold, we knew it not;" doth not he that pondereth the heart consider it? and he that keepeth thy soul, doth not he know it? and shall not he render to every man according to his works?
Page 65 - Nay, common Fame is more than ordinarily false, if none of them have found a way to reconcile the Opinions of Rome to the Preferments of England ; and to be so absolutely, directly and cordially Papists, that it is all that Fifteen hundred pounds a year can do to keep them from confessing it.
Page 52 - Stand and hold fast, from henceforth, the place to which you have been heir by the succession of your forefathers, being now delivered to you by the authority of Almighty God, and by the hands of us and all the bishops and servants of God.
Page 90 - It was, in the next place, as strange, that those canons should be published before the liturgy was prepared, (which was not ready in a year after, or thereabouts,) when three or four of the canons were principally for the...
Page 64 - Speaker, to go yet farther, some of them have so industriously laboured to deduce themselves from Rome, that they have given great suspicion that in gratitude they desire to return thither, or at least to meet it half way ; some have evidently laboured to bring in an English, though not a Roman popery : I mean not only the outside and dress of it, but equally absolute ; a blind dependence of the people upon the clergy, and of the clergy upon...
Page 90 - ... no approbation of the clergy, or been communicated to the council, appeared to be so many new laws imposed upon the whole kingdom by the king's sole authority, and contrived by a few private men, of whom they had no good opinion, and who were strangers to the nation : so that it was thought no other than a subjection to England, by receiving laws from thence, of which they were most jealous, and which they most passionately abhorred.
Page 13 - God's justice (a method terribly remarkable In many passages, and upon many persons which we shall be compelled to remember in this discourse,) that the same principles and the same application of those principles should be used to the wresting all sovereign power from the crown, which the crown had a little before made use of for the extending its authority and power, beyond its bounds, to the prejudice of the just rights of the subject...
Page 31 - ... of every county of England, to provide a ship of war for the King's service, and to send it, amply provided and fitted, by such a day to such a place ; and with that writ were sent to each sheriff instructions that, instead of a ship, he should levy upon his county such a sum of money, and return the same to the Treasurer of the Navy for his majesty's use...
Page 22 - ... rights and liberties, but that his royal will and command, in imposing loans and taxes, without common consent in parliament, doth oblige the subjects...

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