Stage-Coach and Tavern Days

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Heritage Books, May 1, 2009 - History - 449 pages
1 Review
A comprehensive study, both light-hearted and serious, of the enormous role of taverns and modes of travel in colonial culture. Some of the chapters discuss the Puritan ordinary, the tavern landlord, tavern fare and tavern ways, signs and symbols, the tav
  

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Review: Stage Coach And Tavern Days

User Review  - Avis Black - Goodreads

This volume gives you an incredible amount of information about travel in the colonial era, much of it completely new and strange to the modern reader. Absolutely fascinating. Read full review

Contents

Chapter Page I The Puritan Ordinary i
1
Oldtime Taverns
30
The Tavern Landlord
62
Tavern Fare and Tavern Ways
76
Killdevil and its Affines
100
Small Drink
121
Signs and Symbols
138
The Tavern in War
170
Packhorse and Conestoga Wagon
241
Early Stagecoaches and Other Vehicles
253
Two Stage Veterans of Massachusetts
291
A Staging Centre 38
308
The Stagedriver 32
320
The Romance of the Road 34
340
The Pains of Stagecoach Travel
361
Knights of the Road
373

The Tavern Panorama
194
From Path to Turnpike
223
Tavern Ghosts
409
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About the author (2009)

Alice Morse Earle (1851-1911) was an American historian and author from Worcester, Massachusetts. She was christened Mary Alice by her parents Edwin Morse and Abby Mason Clary. On 15 April 1874, she married Henry Earle of New York, changing her name from Mary Alice Morse to Alice Morse Earle. Her writings, beginning in 1890, focussed on small sociological details rather than grand details, and thus are invaluable for modern sociologists. She wrote a number of books on Colonial America (and especially the New England region) such as Curious Punishments of Bygone Days. She was a passenger aboard the RMS Republic when, while in a dense fog, that ship collided with the SS Florida. During the transfer of passengers, Alice fell into the water. Her near drowning in 1909 off the coast of Nantucket during this abortive trip to Egypt weakened her health sufficiently that she died two years later, in Hempstead, Long Island.

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