Shakespeare's Comedy of All's Well that Ends Well (Google eBook)

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American book Company, 1905 - Florence (Italy) - 232 pages
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Page 27 - It were all one That I should love a bright particular star, And think to wed it, he is so above me : In his bright radiance and collateral light Must I be comforted, not in his sphere.
Page 30 - Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie, Which we ascribe to heaven : the fated sky Gives us free scope ; only, doth backward pull Our slow designs, when we ourselves are dull.
Page 55 - They say miracles are past ; and we have our philosophical persons, to make modern and familiar, things supernatural and causeless. Hence is it that we make trifles of terrors ; ensconcing ourselves into seeming knowledge, when we should submit ourselves to an unknown fear.
Page 114 - Yet am I thankful : if my heart were great, Twould burst at this: Captain, I'll be no more; But I will eat and drink, and sleep as soft As captain shall : simply the thing I am Shall make me live. Who knows himself a braggart. Let him fear this ; for it will come to pass, That every braggart shall be found an ass.
Page 50 - gainst remedy : He that of greatest works is finisher Oft does them by the weakest minister : So holy writ in babes hath judgment shown, When judges have been babes. Great floods have flown From simple sources ; and great seas have dried, When miracles have by the greatest been denied. Oft expectation fails, and most oft there Where most it promises ; and oft it hits, Where hope is coldest, and despair most sits.
Page 186 - Too subtle-potent, tun'd too sharp in sweetness For the capacity of my ruder powers : I fear it much ; and I do fear besides That I shall lose distinction in my joys ; As doth a battle, when they charge on heaps The enemy flying.
Page 41 - I know I love in vain, strive against hope ; Yet, in this captious and intenible sieve, I still pour in the waters of my love, And lack not to lose still : thus, Indian-like, Religious in mine error, I adore The sun, that looks upon his worshipper, But knows of him no more.
Page 205 - That palter with us in a double sense ; That keep the word of promise to our ear, And break it to our hope.
Page 105 - The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together: our virtues would be proud if our faults whipped them not ; and our crimes would despair if they were not cherished by our virtues.

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