The Court-martial of Daniel Boone: A Novel

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Jesse Stuart Foundation, Jan 1, 2005 - Fiction - 309 pages
4 Reviews
Based on a true but little known episode in Daniel Boone's lide, Allan Eckert's first full-length novel re-creates the legendary frontiersman's severest test - the trial for his life at Boonesborough in 1778. A captain during the Revolutionary War, Boone faces court-martial and hanging for such high crimes as betraying his command to the Indians, conspiring to surrender Boonesborough, consorting with the enemy, and accepting favors from the British. And Boone pleads guilty to all of the actions detailed in the charges against him. But he also pleads not guilty to the charge of treason, and to the amazement of the court, he insists on defending himself - disregarding the advice of experienced counsel in favor of a plan only he himself knows. Strong, seemingly irrefutable evidence is added to the prosecution's case with each witness. To a man, they corraborate the capture of Boone and his company by Shawnee Indians, Boone's preferential treatment in the Indian camp.

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Review: The Court-Martial of Daniel Boone

User Review  - Andrew Ward - Goodreads

If you love Boone this is a book for you. Read full review

Review: The Court-Martial of Daniel Boone

User Review  - Eddie - Goodreads

Had such a good time with this book.I was in middle school and saw it, had to read it. Read full review

About the author (2005)

Allan W. Eckert was born in Buffalo, New York on January 30, 1931. He served in the United States Air Force and attended the University of Dayton and Ohio State University. He was a historian, naturalist, novelist, poet, screenwriter and playwright. He wrote over 40 books during his lifetime including A Time of Terror: The Great Dayton Flood, Wild Season, The Silent Sky, The Frontiersmen, Wilderness Empire, The Conquerors, and A Sorrow in Our Heart: The Life of Tecumseh, which were all nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in literature. He received the Newbery Honor Book Award for Incident at Hawk's Hill. He also wrote almost all of the scripts for television's Wild Kingdom and adapted The Frontiersmen into the play Tecumseh! He died of prostate cancer on July 7, 2011 at the age of 80.

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