The Paradiso (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Aug 1, 2001 - Fiction - 400 pages
22 Reviews
In The Paradiso, Dante explores the goal of human striving: the merging of individual destiny with universal order. One of the towering creations of world literature, this epic discovery of truth is a work of mystical intensity? an immortal hymn to God, Nature, Eternity, and Love.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
9
4 stars
5
3 stars
5
2 stars
3
1 star
0

Review: Paradiso (The Divine Comedy #3)

User Review  - no - Goodreads

Where once we had concrete stories and bodies subject to matter-of-fact tortures, then dissipating shades and palisade sculpture and visual art, Paradiso's guiding visual conceits are in the abstract ... Read full review

Review: The Paradiso (The Divine Comedy #3)

User Review  - Goodreads

So glad to have read The Divine Comedy. What a great way to end this epic poem. Hope to read more of his writings in the future. Read full review

Contents

Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes

Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Notes
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Dante Alighieri was considered Italy's greatest poet. He is the author of the three canticles, "The Inferno," "The Purgatorio," and "The Paradiso," along with "La Vita Nuova," He died in 1321. John Ciardi was a distinguished poet and professor, having taught at Harvard and Rutgers universities, and is a poetry editor of "The Saturday Review," He was a winner of the Harriet Monroe Memorial Award and the Prix de Rome.

Bibliographic information