Ottoman Reform and Muslim Regeneration

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I.B.Tauris, Jun 11, 2005 - History - 233 pages
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This book focuses on the evolution of Ottoman reform as it was perceived, and negotiated, from the perspectives of the capital Istanbul and of the Arab provinces of Syria, including Palestine. It also examines the close interrelationship between the symbolic and actual measures introduced by the state, and the role of Islam as its foundational ethos and as the religion of the majority of the population. The twelve case studies included in this volume reveal the extent of the changes that the Ottoman Empire underwent throughout the period, ranging from the Ottoman dynasty and court at the top, to the marginalized Druzes and Bedouin populations on the periphery.
  

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Contents

The Question of Caliphate under
17
Who is the Next Ottoman Sultan? Attempts
37
The Ottoman Reforms and Shaykh Shamil
55
Law and Sufism on the Eve of Reform
69
Traditional AntiWahhabi Hanbalism
81
The Caliph and the Shaykhs
97
Ottomanism and Syrian
111
The Syrian Educated Elite and the Literary
127
The Aristocracy of the Upper Galilee
167
The Remaking of Beersheba Winds
187
Perceptions of the First World War in
211
Contributors
225
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About the author (2005)

Itzchak Weismann and Fruma Zachs are lecturers at the Department of Middle Eastern History, the University of Haifa, Israel.

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