The Library's Legal Answer Book (Google eBook)

Front Cover
American Library Association, 2003 - Law - 361 pages
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Publisher's description: Libraries are in the thick of legal issues as new technologies add layers of complexity to everyday work in the library. How do you know what's legal? What can you do to identify and address issues before they turn into bona fide legal matters? Where do you turn for help? With coverage of all the issues of the day--filters, fair use, copyright, Web publishing and Internet use, software sharing, ADA compliance, free speech, privacy, access, and employment and liability issues--you will have a "librarian's J.D." in short order! Detailed and ready-to-apply answers to more than 600 legal questions will make this trouble-shooting guide your favorite quick-reference.
  

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The library's legal answer book

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Are you getting ready to change or update your library's policies? Ever wonder if you were breaking any laws showing that movie to the pack of kids who just walked in your door? Minow, a consultant ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

LIBRARIES AND COPYRIGHT
13
DESIGNING THE LIBRARY WEB PAGE
85
FILTERS AND OTHER RESTRICTIONS ON INTERNET ACCESS
124
DIGITAL LIBRARY RESOURCES AND PATRONS WITH DISABILITIES
140
LIBRARY RECORDS AND PRIVACY
163
MEETING ROOMS AND DISPLAYS The Public Soapbox inside the Library
222
PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY Reference Collection Book Reviews Latchkey Children
240
ISSUES IN LIBRARY EMPLOYMENT
277
FRIENDS THE INTERNET AND LOBBYING
321
Index
339
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 27 - ... (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes; (2) the nature of the copyrighted work; (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.
Page 40 - January 1, 1978, all legal or equitable rights that are equivalent to any of the exclusive rights within the general scope of copyright...

About the author (2003)

Mary Minow, a librarian who went to law school, is consultant with LibraryLaw.com, a Website devoted to legal issues in libraries. She has worked as an attorney, public library branch manager, and online database consultant. She served as adjunct professor of library law at San Jose State University's School of Library and in Information Science. She is a regular contributor to California Libraries, conducts workshops on legal issues for librarians, and is past president of the California Association of Library Trustees and Commissioners. Minow earned a master's degree in library science from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and a Doctorate in Jurisprudence from Stanford University.

Tomas A. Lipinski has worked in a variety of legal settings, including the private, public, and nonprofit sectors. He taught at the American Institute for Paralegal Studies and at Syracuse University College of Law. In summers he is a visiting professor at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. From 1999 to 2003, during summers, he taught at the Department of Information Science, School of Information Technology, at the University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa. Professor Lipinski was the first named member of the Global Law Faculty, Faculty of Law, University of Leuven (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven), Belgium, in fall 2006, where he continues to lecture annually at its Centre for Intellectual Property Rights and Interdisciplinary Centre for Law and ICT. Prior to becoming Executive Associate Dean at Indiana University School of Library and Information Science, in 2011, he was Director of the MLIS program at the School of Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. Beginning in January 2013, he will be Director of the School of Library and Information Science, Kent State University in Ohio. Author of The Complete Copyright Liability Handbook for Librarians and Educators, he researches, teaches, publishes, and speaks widely on issues relating to information and Internet law and policy, especially copyright in schools, libraries, and other information settings. He holds a law degree from Marquette University, a master of laws degree from the John Marshall Law School, and a doctorate in library and information science from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign.

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