Frondes agrestes. Readings in 'Modern painters' [by J. Ruskin], chosen by the younger lady of the Thwaite, Coniston [S. Beever]. (Google eBook)

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Page 148 - One lesson, shepherd, let us two divide, Taught both by what she shows, and what conceals Never to blend our pleasure or our pride With sorrow of the meanest thing that feels.
Page 113 - For he is the Lord our God : and we are the people of his pasture, and the sheep of his hand.
Page 96 - I beheld, and, lo, there was no man, and all the birds of the heavens were fled. I beheld, and, lo, the fruitful place was a wilderness, and all the cities thereof were broken down at the presence of the LORD, and by his fierce anger.
Page 55 - The hills melted like wax at the presence of the Lord, at the presence of the Lord of the whole earth.
Page 114 - For thou shalt be in league with the stones of the field : And the beasts of the field shall be at peace with thee.
Page 62 - I say unto you, Swear not at all : neither by heaven ; for it is God's throne : nor by the earth ; for it is his footstool...
Page 169 - Perhaps there is no more impressive scene on earth than the solitary extent of the Campagna of Rome under evening light. Let the reader imagine himself for a moment withdrawn from the sounds and motion of the living world, and sent forth alone into this wild and wasted plain. The earth yields and crumbles beneath his foot, tread he never so lightly, for its substance is white, hollow, and carious, like the dusty wreck of the bones of men. The long knotted grass waves and tosses feebly in...
Page 14 - ... can do and say, and the rest of the world's sayings and doings. All great men not only know their business, but usually know that they know it; and are not only right in their main opinions, but they usually know that they are right in them; only, they do not think much of themselves on that account. Arnolfo knows he can build a good dome at Florence; Albert Durer writes calmly to one who had found fault with his work, "It cannot be better done...
Page 38 - ... it is not in the broad and fierce manifestations of the elemental energies, nor in the clash of the hail, nor the drift of the whirlwind, that the highest characters of the sublime are developed. God is not in the earthquake, nor in the fire : but in the still, small voice.
Page 133 - Consider what we owe merely to the meadow grass, to the covering of the dark ground by that glorious enamel, by the companies of those soft, and countless, and peaceful spears.

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