The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life (Google eBook)

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Yale University Press, 2011 - Literary Criticism - 357 pages
13 Reviews

"Literary criticism, as I attempt to practice it," writes Harold Bloom in "The Anatomy of Influence," "is in the first place literary, that is to say, personal and passionate."

For more than half a century, Bloom has shared his profound knowledge of the written word with students and readers. In this, his most comprehensive and accessible study of influence, Bloom leads us through the labyrinthine paths which link the writers and critics who have informed and inspired him for so many years. The result is "a critical self-portrait," a sustained meditation on a life lived with and through the great works of the Western canon: "Why has influence been my lifelong obsessive concern? Why have certain writers found me and not others? What is the end of a literary life?"

Featuring extended analyses of Bloom's most cherished poets--Shakespeare, Whitman, and Crane--as well as inspired appreciations of Emerson, Tennyson, Browning, Yeats, Ashbery, and others, "The Anatomy of Influence" adapts Bloom's classic work "The Anxiety of Influence" to show us what great literature is, how it comes to be, and why it matters. Each chapter maps startling new literary connections that suddenly seem inevitable once Bloom has shown us how to listen and to read. A fierce and intimate appreciation of the art of literature on a scale that the author will not again attempt, "The" "Anatomy of Influence" follows the sublime works it studies, inspiring the reader with a sense of something ever more about to be.

  

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Review: The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life

User Review  - Anna Maria Ballester Bohn - Goodreads

Yes, I made it through the monster. It made me re-read Milton and discover John Ashbery. It probably deserves four or five stars. But it also contains this sentence, referring to DH Lawrence's "Song ... Read full review

Review: The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life

User Review  - Heather - Goodreads

Bloom traces the influences of poets through time, especially focusing on Shakespeare and Whitman. His lifetime devotion to critiquing literature is reviewed from a mature place, and he looks back on his own evolving ideas in the course of this text. Read full review

Contents

LEOPARDIS LUCRETIAN SWERVE
SHELLEYS HEIRS
WHOSE CONDITION OF FIRE?
Whitman and the Death of Europe in the Evening Land
EMERSON AND A POETRY YET TO BE WRITTEN
WHITMANS TALLY
DEATH AND THE POET
NOTES TOWARD A SUPREME FICTION OF THE ROMANTIC SELF

SHAKESPEARES ELLIPSIS
POSSESSION IN MANY MODES
HAMLET AND THE ART OF KNOWING
MILTONS HAMLET
JOYCEDANTESHAKESPEARE MILTON
DR JOHNSON AND CRITICAL INFLUENCE
The Skeptical Sublime
ANXIETIES OF EPICUREAN INFLUENCE
NEAR THE QUICK
HAND OF FIRE
WHITMANS PRODIGALS
CODA
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
CREDITS
INDEX
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Harold Bloom was born on July 11, 1930 in New York City. He earned his Bachelor of Arts from Cornell in 1951 and his Doctorate from Yale in 1955. After graduating from Yale, Bloom remained there as a teacher, and was made Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1983. Bloom's theories have changed the way that critics think of literary tradition and has also focused his attentions on history and the Bible. He has written over twenty books and edited countless others. He is one of the most famous critics in the world and considered an expert in many fields. In 2010 he became a founding patron of Ralston College, a new institution in Savannah, Georgia, that focuses on primary texts. His works include Fallen Angels, Till I End My Song: A Gathering of Last Poems, Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life and The Shadow of a Great Rock: A Literary Appreciation of The King James Bible.

The Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University, Harold Bloom (b. 1930) has been hailed as one of our greatest living literary critics (Los Angeles Times).

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