Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation (Google eBook)

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Univ of North Carolina Press, 2010 - History - 368 pages
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With more than 50,000 enrolled members, North Carolina's Lumbee Indians are the largest Native American tribe east of the Mississippi River. Malinda Maynor Lowery, a Lumbee herself, describes how, between Reconstruction and the 1950s, the Lumbee crafted and maintained a distinct identity in an era defined by racial segregation in the South and paternalistic policies for Indians throughout the nation. They did so against the backdrop of some of the central issues in American history, including race, class, politics, and citizenship.
  

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This book was very informative and also included the family of "Chavers" of Roberson County, N.C. whom I descended from.
Stephanie Shavers (Chavis, Chavers, Chavous, Chavez) Jackson

Contents

Coming Together
1
1 ADAPTING TO SEGREGATION
19
2 MAKING HOME AND MAKING LEADERS
55
3 TAKING SIDES
81
4 CONFRONTING THE NEW DEAL
121
Gaining Economic Autonomy
149
6 MEASURING IDENTITY
181
7 RECOGNIZING THE LUMBEE
213
Creating a Lumbee and Tuscarora Future
251
Appendix
265
Notes
275
Index
331
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About the author (2010)

Malinda Maynor Lowery (Lumbee) is an assistant professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a native of Robeson County, North Carolina.

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