Debating the civil rights movement, 1945-1968

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Rowman & Littlefield, 1998 - History - 167 pages
1 Review
This excellent introduction to the civil rights movement captures the drama and impact of the black struggle for equality. Written by two of the most respected scholars of African-American history, Steven F. Lawson and Charles Payne examine the individuals who made the movement a success, both at the highest level of government and in the grassroot trenches.

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Review: Debating the Civil Rights Movement, 1945 1968

User Review  - SUSAN OWEN GLASER - Goodreads

GOOD NARRATIVE OF THOSE WHO WALKED THE NONVIOLENT WALK. THERE SHOILD BE A BOOK SHELF FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WRITERS!!! Read full review

Review: Debating the Civil Rights Movement, 1945 1968

User Review  - em ma - Goodreads

payne = <3 spent hours outside a coffee shop taking notes about queer theory in relation to the civil rights movement, it was an amazing afternoon Read full review

Contents

The Report of
45
The Southern
54
Dwight D Eisenhowers Radio and Television Address
60
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

STEVEN F. LAWSON has taught at the University of South Florida and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and is now professor of American history and vice-chair for undergraduate education at Rutgers University. He is the author of "Black Ballots: Voting Rights in the South, 19441;1969; In Pursuit of Power: Southern Blacks and Electoral Politics, 19651;1982; Running for Freedom: Civil Rights and Black Politics in America Since 1941;" and, with Charles Payne, "Debating the Civil Rights Movement, 19451;1968," He served as an academic adviser to the public television documentary series "Eyes on the Prize," I and II. He is currently completing a volume of his essays on the civil rights movement.

Charles M. Payne is the Sally Dalton Robinson Professor of African American studies, History and Sociology at Duke University. He is the author of the prize-winning "I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition in the
Mississippi Civil Rights Movement".

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