Moral reasoning for journalists

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Praeger, Dec 23, 2008 - Business & Economics - 243 pages
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Despite the fact that the public's trust in the news media is at historic lows, despite the fact that hardly a day goes by without another report of unethical behavior by news professionals, journalists and teachers remain dedicated to ethical issues--perhaps more so now than at any other time in history. News companies are developing rigorous codes of conduct; journalists and editors are vigorously reporting on ethical lapses by their peers, and many journalism schools are creating standalone courses in journalism ethics and hiring faculty members who are devoted to ethics research and instruction. Using more than two-dozen actual cases from around the world to examine and apply those principles of ethical journalism, Knowlton and Reader suggest an easy-to-follow, commonsense approach to making ethical decisions in the newsroom as deadlines loom. Moral Reasoning for Journalists serves as an introduction to the underpinnings of journalism ethics, and as a guide for journalists and journalism teachers looking for ways to make ethical choices beyond "going with your gut."

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Contents

Tough Calls from the Front Lines
75
What Sets Real Journalism Apart from
100
TurnEm In Get the Story or Both?
116
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (2008)

STEVEN KNOWLTON is Professor of Journalism at Dublin City University. He has 18 years of professional newspaper experience, and continues to freelance for the New York Times and other major newspapers. He is the author/editor of six books, including the first edition of Moral Reasoning for Journalists, The Journalist's Moral Compass (with Patrick R. Parsons) and most recently (with Karen L. Freeman), Fair and Balanced: A History of Journalistic Objectivity.

Bill Reader (M.A. & B.A.; The Pennsylvania State University) is a tenured Associate Professor in the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University. He has been teaching journalism at the collegiate level since 1997, and was a working journalist (reporter, photographer, copy editor, and opinion-page editor) from 1992 to 2000. He is the author of several studies of journalism ethics and practice published in top peer-reviewed journals, as well as a co-authored book about journalism ethics and several chapters for academic books. He was the founding research chair of the Community Journalism Interest Group of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMe, and has served as secretary, vice-chair, and chair of that group. Reader also is an academic partner and steering-committee member of the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues and an active member of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors. He is a member of the editorial board of Newspaper Research Journal and served as guest editor of a special issue of the journal focused on community newspapers.

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