The American pageant: a history of the Republic

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Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001 - History - 1135 pages
16 Reviews

Supported by colorful anecdotes, first-person quotations, and its trademark wit, The American Pageant is one of the most readable, popular, and effective American history textbooks available.

Pedagogy includes chapter-ending chronologies, numerous interesting quotes from historical figures, and incisive part openers that contextualize six major periods in American history. The Appendix includes "Suggested Readings" for every chapter, an annotated Constitution of the United States, and an extensive statistical profile of the United States.

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User Review - Flag as inappropriate

too many flowery descriptions. the author needs to get to the point already. it's not a creative writing class, it's US history.

Review: The American Pageant: A History of the Republic

User Review  - Kristen Kopko - Goodreads

The worst experience of my life. Read full review

Contents

Part
2
The World Today Inside Back CoverNot AP Version
6
The World Known to Europe 1492
12
Copyright

72 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

David M. Kennedy received his Ph.D. from Yale University. He is the Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History and co-director of The Bill Lane Center for the Study of the North American West at Stanford University. His first book, BIRTH CONTROL IN AMERICA: THE CAREER OF MARGARET SANGER, was honored with both the Bancroft Prize and the John Gilmary Shea Prize. He has won numerous teaching awards at Stanford, where he teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses in American political, diplomatic, intellectual, and social history, and in American literature. Dr. Kennedy published a volume in the OXFORD HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, FREEDOM FROM FEAR: THE AMERICAN PEOPLE IN DEPRESSION AND WAR, 1929-1945, for which he was honored with the 2000 Pulitzer Prize. He is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Philosophical Society, and he serves on the board of the Pulitzer Prizes.

Lizabeth Cohen received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. She is the Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies and chair of the history department of Harvard University. In 2007-2008, she was the Harmsworth Professor of American History at Oxford University. Previously, she taught at New York University and Carnegie Mellon University. The author of many articles and essays, Dr. Cohen was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for her first book, MAKING A NEW DEAL: INDUSTRIAL WORKERS IN CHICAGO, 1919-1939, for which she later won the Bancroft Prize. Her recent book, CONSUMPTION IN POSTWAR AMERICA, addresses the political consequences of a mass-consumption economy and culture in post-World War II America. She is writing a book on urban renewal in American cities after World War II. At Harvard, she teaches courses in twentieth-century American history, with particular attention to the intersection of social and cultural life and politics.

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