Comic Art Propaganda: A Graphic History

Front Cover
IIex, 2010 - Comic books, strips, etc - 175 pages
14 Reviews
As one of the most effective and powerful forms of communication, it comes as no surprise that comic art has been misappropriated by governments, self-interest groups, do-gooders, and sinister organizations to spread their message.  World War II comic book propaganda-with Superman, Batman, and Captain America raising war bonds, and bashing cartoon Japanese and Germans-was so ubiquitous that there was barely a US comic untainted by the war effort.  The sub-textual sequential art continued well into the Ciold War, with both sides producing comics extolling themselves and defaming the enemy.   This book is a fascinating visual history of some of the most outrageous, and unbelievable and politically charged comics ever published. 

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Review: Comic Art Propaganda: A Graphic History

User Review  - James Erwin - Goodreads

A fun survey but necessarily incomplete and shallow. Read full review

Review: Comic Art Propaganda: A Graphic History

User Review  - Goodreads

A fun survey but necessarily incomplete and shallow. Read full review

Contents

First in the Service
38
The Beast is Dead SpiderMan and the Reagans Raiders
44
The Comic Side
52
Copyright

2 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Fredrik Stromberg was born in 1968 in the South of Sweden. He is the editor of "Bild & Bubbla", Scandinavia s largest magazine about comics, writes regularly about comics, heads a school for comic artists and sits on the editorial board for the International Journal of Comics Art. He lives in Sweden.

Bibliographic information