The Two Gentlemen of Verona (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Feb 1, 2000 - Drama - 128 pages
4 Reviews
“They do not love that do not show their love.”
—Two Gentlemen of Verona
 
Eminent Shakespearean scholars Jonathan Bate and Eric Rasmussen provide a fresh new edition of the classic comedy of courtship and delicious rivalry.
 
THIS VOLUME ALSO INCLUDES MORE THAN A HUNDRED PAGES OF EXCLUSIVE FEATURES:
 
• an original Introduction to Two Gentlemen of Verona
• incisive scene-by-scene synopsis and analysis with vital facts about the work
• commentary on past and current productions based on interviews with leading directors, actors, and designers
• photographs of key RSC productions
• an overview of Shakespeare’s theatrical career and chronology of his plays
 
Ideal for students, theater professionals, and general readers, these modern and accessible editions from the Royal Shakespeare Company set a new standard in Shakespearean literature for the twenty-first century.
  

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Review: The Two Gentlemen of Verona

User Review  - The Chestertonian (Sarah G) - Goodreads

Thought to have been one of Shakespeare's early plays, which would make sense because the plot and characterization were both pretty weak. Read full review

Review: The Two Gentlemen of Verona

User Review  - Goodreads

Thought to have been one of Shakespeare's early plays, which would make sense because the plot and characterization were both pretty weak. Read full review

Contents

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE OF STRATFORDUPONAVON GENTLEMAN
THE QUESTION OF AUTHORSHIP
Books About the Shakespeare Texts
I1Enter Valentine and Proteus
I2Enter Julia and Lucetta
II1Enter Valentine and Speed
II2Enter Proteus and Julia
II3Enter Launce leading a dog
III1Enter Duke Thurio and Proteus
III2Enter Duke and Thurio
IV1Enter Valentine Speed and certain Outlaws
IV2Enter Proteus
IV3Enter Eglamour
IV4Enter Launce with his dog
V1Enter Eglamour
V2Enter Thurio Proteus and Julia disguised as a boy

II4Enter Valentine Silvia Thurio and Speed
II5Enter Speed and Launce
II6Enter Proteus solus
II7Enter Julia and Lucetta
V3Enter Silvia led by Outlaws
V4Enter Valentine
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

William Shakespeare was born in Stratford-upon-Avon, England, in 1564. He is widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language. We're pretty sure he would think this version of his play is awesome.

Stephen Orgel is the J. E. Reynolds Professor in Humanities at Stanford University. His books include "The Authentic Shakespeare," "Impersonations: The Performance of Gender in Shakespeare's England," and "The Illusion of Power," In addition to his Shakespeare editions, he has edited works of Ben Jonson, Marlowe, and Milton.
A. R. Braunmuller is professor of English and comparative literature at UCLA, where he teaches courses on English and European drama from 1500 to the present. He has written critical volumes on George Peele and George Chapman and has edited "King John" and "Macbeth,

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