Forging Freedom: The Formation of Philadelphia's Black Community, 1720-1840

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, 1988 - History - 354 pages
1 Review

This book is the first to trace the good and bad fortunes, over more than a century, of the earliest large free black community in the United States. Gary Nash shows how, from colonial times through the Revolution and into the turbulent 1830s, blacks in the City of Brotherly Love struggled to shape a family life, gain occupational competence, organize churches, establish neighborhoods and social networks, advance cultural institutions, educate their children in schools, forge a political consciousness, and train black leaders who would help abolish slavery. These early generations of urban blacks--many of them newly emancipated--constructed a rich and varied community life.

Nash's account includes elements of both poignant triumph and profound tragedy. Keeping in focus both the internal life of the black community and race relations in Philadelphia generally, he portrays first the remarkable vibrancy of black institution-building, ordinary life, and relatively amicable race relations, and then rising racial antagonism. The promise of a racially harmonious society that took form in the postrevolutionary era, involving the integration into the white republic of African people brutalized under slavery, was ultimately unfulfilled. Such hopes collapsed amid racial conflict and intensifying racial discrimination by the 1820s. This failure of the great and much-watched "Philadelphia experiment" prefigured the course of race relations in America in our own century, an enduringly tragic part of this country's past.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Forging Freedom: The Formation of Philadelphia's Black Community, 1720-1840

User Review  - Sue - Goodreads

From the back: This book is the first to trace the good and bad fortunes, over more than a century, of the earliest large free black community in the United States. Gary Nash shows how, from the ... Read full review

Related books

Contents

Introduction
1
The Black Revolution in Philadelphia
38
Becoming Free
66
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

References from web pages

JSTOR: Forging Freedom: The Formation of Philadelphia's Black ...
Forging Freedom: The Formation of Philadelphia's Black Community, 1720-1840. By Gary B. Nash. (Cambridge, Mass., and London: Har- vard University Press, ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0022-4642(198911)55%3A4%3C704%3AFFTFOP%3E2.0.CO%3B2-O

History:Historians At Work: How Did American Slavery Begin ...
Nash, Gary B. Forging Freedom: The Formation of Philadelphia's Black Community, 1720-1840. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1988. Patterson, Orlando. ...
www.bedfordstmartins.com/ history/ series/ hw/ slavery/ read.htm

OSU Department of History
Gary B. Nash, Forging Freedom: the Formation of Philadelphia's Black Community. 1720-1840 (1991) Henry Louis Gates, Jr., ed., The Classic Slave Narratives ...
history.osu.edu/ courses/ syllabi/ hist32301.doc

The African-American Census::Additional Resources
"The Dream Deferred" is the concluding chapter of Gary Nash's work Forging Freedom: The Formation of Philadelphia's Black Community, 1720-1840. ...
www.brynmawr.edu/ iconog/ aacens38/ Bibliography.htm

Your Bibliography
Sections. Home · What Is NHD? This Year's Theme · Previous Years · Online Resources · Participating Partners · For Educators · For Parents · For Students...
www.ushistory.org/ nhdphilly/ students/ cite.htm

Richard S. Newman, Roy E. Finkenbine, and Douglass Mooney ...
THIS petition was discovered in the archives of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania by Roy E. Finkenbine.1 Bearing the signatures of fifty-five ...
www.historycooperative.org/ journals/ wm/ 64.1/ newman2.html

HST 296A - Community in Early America - Syllabus Spr 2005
University of Vermont, Department of History, Professor J. Carr History 296A: Community in Early America Spring 2005. Wednesday 3:30-6:15 in Wheeler 102 ...
www.uvm.edu/ ~hag/ personal/ portfolio/ hst296a/ 296a-syllabus.html

African Americans in the Early Republic | Gary B. Nash | OAH ...
Any teacher using a textbook published before the 1980s would find virtually nothing on African Americans—slave or free, North or South—in the era of the ...
www.oah.org/ pubs/ magazine/ earlyrepublic/ nash.html

In Light and Shadow: Friends and Slavery | Friends General Conference
Fit for Freedom Menu 1. What's New · Calendar of Events · Author Interviews · Black Quaker Profiles · From the Bookstore · Contact Us · Related Links ...
www.fgcquaker.org/ fit-for-freedom/ in-light-and-shadow-friends-and-slavery

History 410: Urban Archipelago: Seminar in African American Urban ...
HISTORY 410/510: Urban Archipelago: Seminar in African American Urban History University of Oregon, Spring Term 2006 Syllabus ...
faculty.washington.edu/ qtaylor/ Courses/ 410-UA-AAUH/ 410_syllabus.htm

About the author (1988)

Gary B. Nash received his B. A. from Princeton University in 1955 and his Ph.D. from Princeton in 1964. He earned the position of Director of the National Center for History in the Schools at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he taught colonial and revolutionary American history since 1974. Nash has received research grants from the University of California Institute of Humanities and American Philosophical Society and fellowships from the Guggenheim Memorial and American Council of Learned Society. He won the University of California Distinguished Emeriti Award and the Defense of Academic Freedom Award, from the National Council for Social Studies. Nash is the Founding Member and has been on the Board of Trustees of the National Council for History Education since 1990 and was Vice-Chair in 1992. He was also President of the Organization of American Historians, from 1994-95. Among the books Nash has authored are Quakers and Politics: Pennsylvania, 1681-1726; Red, White and Black: The Peoples of Early America; The Urban Crucible: Social Change, Political Consciousness, and the Origins of the American Revolution; Forging Freedom: The Black Urban Experience in Philadelphia, 1720-1840; and The Forgotten Fifth: African Americans in the Age of Revolution.

Bibliographic information