Speak Like a CEO: Secrets for Commanding Attention and Getting Results: Secrets for Communicating Attention and Getting Results (Google eBook)

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McGraw Hill Professional, Apr 21, 2005 - Business & Economics - 240 pages
8 Reviews

An award-winning news anchor presents methods for better communication in any business environment

During her 20 years in broadcasting, award-winning news anchor Suzanne Bates conducted more than 10,000 interviews, during which she witnessed business leaders, politicians, and celebrities at their best and worst. Now a top CEO communication coach, Bates is renowned for her uncanny ability to transform even the shyest oratorical mouse into a public-speaking lion. In Speak Like a CEO, Bates:

  • Reveals the secrets for communicating in any situation
  • Describes simple techniques for acing speeches, presentations, media interviews, Q&A sessions, business meetings, and more
  • Outlines self-improvement plans that can easily be customized to your needs
  • Shares secrets from top leaders, including Mario Cuomo's technique for overcoming stage fright and Colin Powell's secret for projecting authenticity
  

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Review: Speak Like a CEO: Secrets for Commanding Attention and Getting Results: Secrets for Communicating Attention and Getting Results

User Review  - Adeel Khan - Goodreads

Good book Read full review

Review: Speak Like a CEO: Secrets for Commanding Attention and Getting Results: Secrets for Communicating Attention and Getting Results

User Review  - Tony Johnson - Goodreads

Chapter 1 This first chapter uses a few compelling examples to build the argument that to be a good leader, you must be able to communicate clearly to those who need the information that you have. The ... Read full review

Contents

A Survival Guide for the Events Where You Must Speak and Be Great
89
Become a Great Speaker by Making a Plan and Working It
173
Checklists
191
Frequently Asked Questions
195
Resources and Recommended Reading
199
Communication and Leadership
203
The Gettysburg Address Abraham Lincoln
211
Index
213
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 22 - We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade, and do the other things, not because they are easy but because they are hard; because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills; because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win — and the others, too.
Page 179 - Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice ; it is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved.
Page 62 - It is true that you may fool all the people some of the time; you can even fool some of the people all the time; but you can't fool all of the people all the time.
Page 26 - Most of the important things in the world have been accomplished by people who have kept on trying when there seemed to be no hope at all.
Page 81 - I'ma great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the more I have of it.
Page 184 - The secret of joy in work is contained in one word — excellence. To know how to do something well is to enjoy it.
Page 104 - The main part of intellectual education is not the acquisition of facts, but learning how to make facts live. Culture, in the sense of fruitless knowledge, I for one abhor. The mark of a master is, that facts which before lay...
Page 71 - It is deciding how you will go about achieving it and staying with that plan.

About the author (2005)

Suzanne Bates is a communication consultant to a host of prestigious clients, including Mellon Financial, State Street Bank, Ernst & Young, Sun Life, Dreyfus, Citistreet, Sepracor, and Cabot Corporation. For two decades she was a top-rated anchor with WBZ-TV, Boston; WCAU, Philadelphia; and WFLA-TV, Tampa-St. Petersburg. She is a member of the Leadership Council of Harvard University's Center for Business and Government and is an Associated Press News Award winner. For more information, visit www.speaklikeaceo.com.

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