VOODOO IN NEW ORLEANS (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Pelican Publishing Company, Mar 1, 1984 - History - 256 pages
33 Reviews
"Interesting investigation and straightforward handling of sensational times and tricksters, of the cult of voodooism in all its manifestations. From its first known appearances in New Orleans of 200 years ago, here are the fetishes and formulae, the rites and dances, the cures, charms and gris-gris. Here were the witch-doctors and queens, and in particular a Doctor John who acquired fame and fortune, and Marie Laveau, who with her daughter dominated the weird underworld of voodoo for nearly a century."
-Kirkus Reviews "Robert Tallant speaks with authority."
-The New York Times "Much nonsense has been written about voodoo in New Orleans. . .here is a truthful and definitive picture."
-Lyle Saxton Originally published in 1946, Voodoo In New Orleans examines the origins of the cult voodooism. The lives of New Orleans's most infamous witch doctors and voodoo queens have been re-created in this well-researched account of New Orleans's dark underworld.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
6
3 stars
11
2 stars
10
1 star
1

Review: Voodoo in New Orleans

User Review  - Richard - Goodreads

A product of the era. Once you get past the archaic race fixations, it isn't a bad book. The stories behind the various voodoo queens and witch-doctors are compelling and descriptive. A must for fans of Marie Laveau I and II. Read full review

Review: Voodoo in New Orleans

User Review  - Goodreads

A product of the era. Once you get past the archaic race fixations, it isn't a bad book. The stories behind the various voodoo queens and witch-doctors are compelling and descriptive. A must for fans of Marie Laveau I and II. Read full review

Contents

Evolution
3
Li Grand Zombi
9
The Goat without Horns
15
Copyright

25 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1984)

ROBERT TALLANT (1909-1957) was one of Louisiana's best-known authors and a participant in the WPA Writers' Project during the 1930s and 1940s. During the last years of his life, he was a lecturer in English at Newcomb College.

Bibliographic information