The Catholic miscellany and monthly repository of information (Google eBook)

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Page 42 - Oh Death ! where is thy sting ? Oh Grave ! where is thy victory ? The sting of Death is sin, and the strength of sin is the Law.
Page 208 - ... a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black stinking fume thereof, nearest resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of the pit that is bottomless.
Page 46 - Dissenters are not now excluded), would, under certain conditions to be specified, be highly advisable, with a view to the tranquillity and improvement of Ireland, and to the general interest of the United Kingdom. For himself, he is on full consideration convinced, that the measure would be attended with no danger to the established church, or to the Protestant interest in Great Britain or Ireland : That now the Union has taken place, and with the new provisions which...
Page 47 - ... and control ; that, besides these provisions, the general interests of the Established Church, and the security of the constitution and government, might be effectually strengthened by requiring the political test, before referred to, from the preachers of all Catholic or Dissenting congregations, and from the teachers of schools of every denomination.
Page 34 - No weapon that is formed against thee shall prosper ; and every tongue that shall rise against thee in judgment thou shalt condemn. This is the heritage of the servants of the Lord, and their righteousness is of me, saith the Lord.
Page 47 - Dissenters, as could give them any new means (if they were so disposed} of attacking the Establishment : that the grounds, on which the laws of exclusion now remaining were founded, have long been narrowed, and are since the Union removed ; that those principles, formerly held by the Catholics, which made them be considered as politically dangerous, have been for a course of time gradually declining, and, among the higher orders particularly, they have ceased to prevail.
Page 18 - Non omnis moriar, multaque pars mei Vitabit Libitinam : usque ego postera Crescam laude recens dum Capitolium Scandet cum tacita virgine pontifex. Dicar qua violens obstrepit Aufidus Et qua pauper aquae Daunus agrestium Regnavit populorum, ex humili potens, Princeps Aeolium carmen ad Italos Deduxisse modos. Sume superbiam Quaesitam meritis et mihi Delphica Lauro cinge volens, Melpomene, comam.
Page 262 - Catholics, who do not love our government ; and who detest, with all their heart, with all their soul, with all their mind, and with all their strength, the party now in Opposition.
Page 400 - I SING of brooks, of blossoms, birds, and bowers, Of April, May, of June, and July flowers ; I sing of May-poles, hock-carts, wassails, wakes, Of bridegrooms, brides, and of their bridal cakes.
Page 281 - For if the casting away of them be the reconciling of the world, what shall the receiving of them be, but life from the dead ? 16 For if the firstfruit be holy, the lump is also holy : and if the root be holy, so are the branches.

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