The Martyr Age of the United States of America: With an Appeal on Behalf of the Oberlin Institute in Aid of the Abolition of Slavery (Google eBook)

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Finlay and Charlton, 1840 - Abolitionists - 44 pages
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Page 5 - I will be as harsh as truth, and as uncompromising as justice. On this subject, I do not wish to think, or speak, or write, with moderation . . . urge me not to use moderation in a cause like the present.
Page 5 - ... cause of emancipation by the coarseness of my invective, and the precipitancy of my measures. The charge is not true. On this question my influence, - humble as it is, - is felt at this moment to a considerable extent, and shall be felt in coming years - not perniciously, but beneficially - not as a curse, but as a blessing; and posterity will bear testimony that I was right. I desire to thank God, that he enables me to disregard "the fear of man which bringeth a snare," and to speak his truth...
Page 30 - knowingly to deliver, to any person whatever, any pamphlet, newspaper, handbill, or other printed paper or pictorial representation, touching the subject of slavery, where, by the laws of the said State, District, or Territory, their circulation was prohibited.
Page 37 - For, remember, the Judge of that day is no respecter of persons. " Pause, I beseech you, and reflect. The present excitement will soon be over ; the voice of conscience will at last be heard ; and in some season of honest thought, even in this world, as you review the scenes of this hour, you will be compelled to say,
Page 9 - ... upon our national escutcheon, and to secure to the colored population of the United States all the rights and privileges which belong to them as men and as Americans, come what may to our persons, our interests, or our reputations, whether we live to witness the triumph of justice, liberty, and humanity, or perish untimely as martyrs in this great, benevolent, and holy cause.
Page 5 - The apathy of the people is enough to make every statue leap from its pedestal, and to hasten the resurrection of the dead. "It is pretended that I am retarding the cause of emancipation by the coarseness of my invective, and the precipitancy of my measures. The charge is not true. On this question, my influence, humble as it is, is felt at this moment to a considerable extent, and shall be felt in coming years— not perniciously, but beneficially— not as a curse, but as a blessing; and POSTERITY...
Page 3 - Resolved, That we never will separate ourselves voluntarily from the slave population in this country ; they are our brethren by the ties of consanguinity, of suffering, and of wrong ; and we feel that there is more virtue in suffering privations with them, than fancied advantages for a season.
Page x - In Georgia, any justice of the peace may, at his discretion, break up any religious assembly of slaves, and may order each slave present to be " corrected without trial, by receiving on the bare back twenty-five stripes with a whip, switch or cow-skin.
Page 9 - ... consistently with this declaration of our principles, to overthrow the most execrable system of slavery that has ever been witnessed upon earth, to deliver our land from its deadliest curse, to wipe out the foulest stain which rests upon our national escutcheon, and to secure to the colored population of the United States all the rights and privileges which belong to them as men and as Americans...
Page 7 - The legislature was petitioned, through the exertions of a leading citizen of Canterbury, Mr. Judson, and a law was obtained in the course of the month of May, making it a penal offence to establish any school for the instruction of coloured persons, not inhabitants of the State, or to instruct, board, or harbour persons entering the State for educational purposes. This law was clearly unconstitutional, as it violated that clause in the constitution which gives to the citizens of each State...

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