The Promise of American Life ... (Google eBook)

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Transaction Publishers, 1975 - 468 pages
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User Review  - Caterina - Goodreads

Good book, but very interesting to see the underlying racism of the author expressed Read full review

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Contents

WHAT IS THE PROMISE OF AMERICAN LIFE?
2
THE FEDERALISTS AND THE REPUBLICANS
28
THE DEMOCRATS AND THE WHIGS
53
SLAVERY AND AMERICAN NATIONALITY
73
THE CONTEMPORARY SITUATION AND ITS PROBLEMS
101
REFORM AND THE REFORMERS
142
RECONSTRUCTION ITS CONDITIONS AND PURPOSES
177
NATIONALITY AND DEMOCRACY NATIONAL ORIGINS
216
THE AMERICAN DEMOCRACY AND ITS NATIONAL PRINCIPLE
266
A NATIONAL FOREIGN POLICY
290
PROBLEMS OF RECONSTRUCTION PART I
316
PROBLEMS OF RECONSTRUCTION PART II
352
CONCLUSIONS THE INDIVIDUAL AND THE NATIONAL PURPOSES
400
INDEX
456
Copyright

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Page 10 - He is an American, who, leaving behind him all his ancient prejudices and manners, receives new ones from the new mode of life he has embraced, the new government he obeys, and the new rank he holds. He becomes an American by being received in the broad lap of our great Alma Mater. Here individuals of all nations are melted into a new race of men, whose labours and posterity will one day cause great changes in the world.
Page 10 - The American is a new man, who acts upon new principles; he must therefore entertain new ideas, and form new opinions.
Page 9 - What then is the American, this new man ? He is either an European, or the descendant of an European, hence that strange mixture of blood, which you will find in no other country. I could point out to you a family whose grandfather was an Englishman, whose wife was Dutch, whose son married a French woman, and whose present four sons have now four wives of different nations.
Page 10 - Wives and children, who before in vain demanded of him a morsel of bread, now, fat and frolicsome, gladly help their father to clear those fields whence exuberant crops are to arise to feed and to clothe them all; without any part being claimed, either by a despotic prince, a rich abbot, or a mighty lord.
Page 24 - In becoming responsible for the subordination of the individual to the demand of a dominant and constructive national purpose, the American state will in effect be making itself responsible for a morally and socially desirable distribution of wealth. The consequences, then, of converting our American national destiny into a national purpose are beginning to be revolutionary. When the Promise of American life is conceived as a national ideal, whose fulfillment is a matter of artful and laborious work,...
Page 455 - If a noble and civilized democracy is to subsist, the common citizen must be something of a saint and something of a hero. We see, therefore, how justly flattering and profound, and at the same time how ominous, was Montesquieu's saying that the principle of democracy is virtue.
Page 7 - Such a promise is to be fulfilled, not by sanguine anticipations, not by a conservative imitation of past achievements, but by laborious, single-minded, clear-sighted, and fearless work.
Page 4 - An America which was not the Land of Promise, which was not informed by a prophetic outlook and a more or less constructive ideal, would not be the America bequeathed to us by our forefathers.

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