The Affectionate Shepherd: Celebrating Richard Barnfield

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Richard Barnfield, Kenneth Borris, George Klawitter
Susquehanna University Press, 2001 - Literary Criticism - 388 pages
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Despite various influential writers' and critics' high praise of the poetry of Richard Barnfield (1574-1620/26?), his work has long been marginalized in English literary history because of its pervasive homoeroticism. Current interest in literary representations of gender and sexuality, in dissent from dominant ideologies, and in the early modern possibilities of same-sexual subjectivities, accounts for the renewed interest in Barnfield's poetry. This new collection of essays seeks to provide a forum for his evaluation and reinterpretation in accord with his topicality for literary studies today.
  

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Contents

The Question of Topical Allusion in Richard Barnfields Pastoral Verse
45
Barnfields Penelope Devereux Exalted and Reviled
62
Great Collin and the Art of Denial
85
Barnfields Homoerotic Appropriation of the Song of Solomon
99
Pastoral Homoeroticism and Barnfield the Affectionate Shepherd
117
Rereading Homoerotic Desire in Barnfields Ganymede Poems
130
Linguistic and Erotic Failure in The Affectionate Shepheard
149
Barnfields Lovers Discourse
174
Barnfields Variations on the Theme of Avarice in Lady Pecunia
251
Montague Summers and the Replevin of Richard Barnfield
265
Orpheus at the Inns of Court
283
The Case for Richard Barnfields Orpheus
305
Richard Barnfields Homosocial Engineering in Orpheus His Journey to Hell
332
Notes on Contributors
361
Works Cited
364
Index
384

Barnfields Homoerotic Advocacy and the Construction of Homosexuality
193

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About the author (2001)

Borris is Professor of English at McGill University.

Klawitter, professor of English, teaches at St. Edward's University where he chairs the Department of English Literature. Previously he taught at Holy Cross College in South Bend, Indiana, and Viterbo University in La Crosse, Wisconsin. He holds an undergraduate degree from the University of Notre Dame, a master's degree in English language and literature from the University of Michigan, and a doctorate in Renaissance literature from the University of Chicago.

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