Ancient laws of Ireland: Uraicect becc and certain other selected Brehon law tracts (Google eBook)

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H.M. Stationery Office, 1901 - Irish language
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Page 293 - ... a woman of whom her husband circulates a false story ; a woman upon whom her husband gives circulation to a satire until she is laughed at ; a woman upon whom a check-blemish is inflicted ; a woman who is sent back and repudiated for another ; a woman who is cheated of bed-rites, so that her husband prefers to lie with servant-boys when it was not necessary for him ; a woman to whom her mate has administered a philtre when entreating her, so that he brings her to fornication ; a woman who is...
Page 293 - ... The Old Irish law and medical tracts also contain provisions in regard to love charms2. The following passage from the Heptads, an Old Irish law tract, makes provision in the case of the administration of a potion for the separation of the parties when its influence abates3. There are with the Feinne seven women who though bound by son and security are competent to separate from cohabitation whatever day they like; and whatever has been given them as their dowry is theirs by right: ... a woman...
Page 275 - ... of it afterwards, she is entitled to nothing, ie she did not charge it upon him until he has completely escaped from her uncaught, ie she is free to the man with whom she has made an assignation until she screams and öfter she screams; the man with whom she has made no assignation issafe till she screams, but it is illegal öfter screaming. Das hier mit '/ scream
Page 229 - A nickname which clings; recitation of a satire of insults in his presence ; to satirize to the face ; to laugh on all sides ; to sneer at his form ; to magnify a blemish ; satire which is written by a bard who is far away and which is recited." Such "crimes of the tongue...
Page 21 - ... nobility] by his art or by his husbandry, or by his talent which God bestowed upon him. From this comes the saying, ' A man is better than his descent.
Page 293 - Ireland, ii. 9 sqq. whatever day they like ; and whatever has been given them as their dowry, is theirs by right : a woman of whom her husband circulates a false story ; a woman upon whom her husband gives circulation to a satire until she is laughed at ; a woman upon whom a check-blemish is inflicted ; a woman who is sent back and repudiated...
Page 389 - The lawful pledge-interests of each woman who satirizes : if it be lost, it is lawful for her to satirize the head of the tribe of the person whom he shelters as to the pledge, until he decides for his honour in "gabla seds.
Page x - the use of the formula seems also to suggest that it was a relic handed down from an early period and possibly connected with the well known septenary division of the grades. The number
Page 77 - He is no brughaid who is not possessed of hundreds. He warns off no individual of whatever shape. He refuses not any company. He keeps no account against a person, though often he come. Such is the brughaid who has dire with the king of a territory.
Page 293 - ... administration of a potion for the separation of the parties when its influence abates3. There are with the Feinne seven women who though bound by son and security are competent to separate from cohabitation whatever day they like; and whatever has been given them as their dowry is theirs by right: ... a woman to whom her mate has administered a philtre when entreating her so that he brings her to fornication .... It was before entering into the law of marriage the philtres were given to her...