How Wars are Got Up in India: The Origin of the Burmese War (Google eBook)

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W. & F. G. Cash, 1853 - Burma - 59 pages
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Page 42 - At length, the Hermes came in sight, rounding the point with the Burmese prizevessel in tow. As she passed the Stockade, guns in rapid succession were opened on the vessels of war; at the same time, volleys of musketry were discharged upon them. The Fox immediately returned the enemy's fire by a terrific broadside ; she likewise thundered forth against the war-boats which...
Page 21 - India, I do hereby declare the rivers of Rangoon, the Bassein, and the Salween above Moulmein, to be in a state of blockade ; and, with the view to the strict enforcement thereof, a competent force will be stationed in, or near, the entrance of the said rivers immediately. "Neutral vessels, lying in either of the blockaded rivers, will be permitted to retire within twenty days from the commencement of the blockade. ' " Given under my hand, on board Her Britannic Majesty's frigate Fnx, ott ' the town...
Page 13 - Saving regard to the additional long list which was delivered to you, of unwarrantable and oppressive acts committed upon British subjects by order of the Governor of Rangoon, as well as to the personal bearing of that functionary towards the Commodore of the squadron, and to his obvious intention of resorting to the usual policy of the Burmese Court by interposing endless delays, and disregard of official communications addressed to him ; his Lordship is of opinion that you exercised a sound discretion...
Page 59 - To. appreciate correctly," says that impersonation of British feeling, '' the character of this compulsory bargain, the reader must recollect that the sum originally demanded of the Burmese for tho indemnification of our injured merchants was 990/. And Lord Dalhousie's terms, even when the guns of our steamers were pointed against Rangoon, comprehended, in consideration of the expenses of the expedition and of compensation for property, a claim of only 100,OOOZ." Well does it become such a people...
Page 13 - Rangoon must be received with caution; not having been made the subject of complaint at the time, these additional cases cannot now be made the groundwork of an increased demand for compensation." It might naturally be supposed that, after this implied reflection upon the incautiousness of the Commodore, there would follow an expression of regret on behalf of the Governor-General at his having...
Page 52 - If, without further delay, negotiation, or correspondence, these conditions shall be consented to, and shall be fulfilled on or before the 1st day of April next, hostile operations shall be stayed, peace between the States shall be renewed, and the King's ship shall be restored. But if untaught by former experience ; forgetful of the irresistible power of the British arms in India ; and heedless of the many additional proofs that have been given of its might, in the successful fall of the powerful...
Page 59 - ... national punishment. Political arithmetic contains no such sum as that which drove England to this unwelcome measure. Had we not the most irrefragable evidence, we might well refuse credence to this story of real rapacity. But the fact is indisputable that England went to war with Burmah, and annihilated its political existence, for the non-payment of a disputed demand of 900. So says the London Times, the authoritative expositor of the opinions and policy of England.
Page 15 - I AM OF OPINION THAT THE KING IS SINCERE, AND THAT HIS GOVERNMENT WILL FULLY ACT UP TO WHAT HE HAS PROMISED. " The future Governor of Rangoon, vested with full powers to settle the demands, is daily expected from Prome. " In order that the Governor-General of India may be informed, as early as possible, of the state of...
Page 58 - Burmese territory; when, suddenly, all demands for pecuniary compensation and apologies cease, and his Lordship is willing to accept the cession of Pegu as a " compensation " and " reparation " for the past, whilst at the same time he pens long minutes to prove how calamitous it will be to us to annex that province to our Indian empire...
Page 57 - Yet it is not a little perplexing to find, in the teeth of all these solemn disavowals of a desire for seizing more territory, that the Governor- General's policy aims directly at the annexation of Pegu, and will admit of no other terms ; and if " a real necessity for advance " should arise, then, in spite of its ruinous consequences,

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