Society, Medicine and Religion in the Sacred Tales of Aelius Aristides

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BRILL, May 7, 2012 - Literary Criticism - 206 pages
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Aelius Aristides' "Sacred Tales" offer a unique opportunity to examine how an educated man of the Second Century CE came to terms with illness. The experiences portrayed in the "Tales" disclose an understanding of illness in both religious and medical terms. Aristides was a devout worshipper of Asclepius while at the same time being a patient of some of the most distinguished physicians of his day. This monograph offers a textual analysis of the "Sacred Tales" in the context of the so-called Second Sophistic; medicine and the medical use of dream interpretation; and religion, with particular emphasis on the cult of Asclepius and the visual means used to convey religious content.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Aelius Aristides and the Sacred Tales
11
Society Disease and Medicine in the Sacred Tales of Aristides
37
Reconsidering Private Religions Religion and Religious Experience in the Sacred Tales of Aelius Aristides
137
Conclusion
181
Bibliography
189
Index
203
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About the author (2012)

Ido Israelowich, D.Phil. (2008) in Ancient History, University of Oxford, is a lecturer of Classics at Tel Aviv University. He has published on various aspects of the work of Aristides and on medicine in the Graeco-Roman World.

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