History of the Intellectual Development of Europe, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Harper & brothers, 1900 - Civilization
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Page 3 - Social advancement is as completely under the control of natural law as is bodily growth. The life of an individual is a miniature of the life of a nation.
Page 132 - He is all similar, all eye, all ear, all brain, all arm, all power to perceive, to understand, and to act ; but in a manner not at all human, in a manner not at all corporeal, in a manner utterly unknown to us. As a blind man has no idea of colours, so have we no idea of the manner by which the all-wise God perceives and understands all things.
Page 132 - Whence also he is all similar, all eye, all ear, all brain, all arm, all power to perceive, to understand, and to act; but in a manner not at all human, in a manner not at all corporeal, in a manner utterly unknown to us.
Page 327 - ... the heavens on all sides. Now I am really at a loss what to say of those who, when they have once gone wrong, steadily persevere in their folly, and defend one absurd opinion by...
Page 266 - ... provinces, and even the cabinet of the prince, were seized by that execrable race, as their lawful prey; where nothing was sacred, nothing safe from the hand of rapacity; where slaves were suborned, or, by their own malevolence, excited against their masters; where freedmen betrayed their patrons; and he, who had lived without an enemy, died by the treachery of a friend.
Page 219 - The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slippered pantaloon, With spectacles on nose and pouch on side, His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
Page 343 - Mary, and a spirit proceeding from him. Believe therefore in God, and his apostles, and say not, There are three Gods; forbear this; it will be better for you. God is but one God. Far be it from him that he should have a son!
Page 120 - Wrongly do the Greeks suppose that aught begins or ceases to be ; for nothing comes into being or is destroyed ; but all is an aggregation or secretion of preexistent things ; so that 'all becoming' might more correctly be called ' becoming mixed,' and all corruption
Page 394 - XII, the amorous Marozia thus having given a son and a grandson to the papacy. John was only nineteen years old when he thus became the head of Christendom. His reign was characterized by the most shocking immoralities, so that the Emperor Otho I was compelled by the German clergy to interfere. A synod was summoned for his trial in the Church of St. Peter, before which it appeared that John had received bribes for the consecration of bishops; that he had ordained one who was...
Page 393 - ... prison and strangled. In the course of five years, from AD 896 to AD 900, five popes were consecrated. Leo V, who succeeded in AD 904, was in less than two months thrown into prison by Christopher, one of his chaplains, who usurped his place, and who, in his turn, was shortly expelled from Rome by Sergius III, who, by the aid of a military force, seized the pontificate, AD 905. This man, according to the testimony of the times, lived in criminal intercourse with the celebrated prostitute Theodora,...

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