Chart No. 1: Symbols, Abbreviations, and Terms

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Paradise Cay Publications, Jan 1, 2010 - Transportation - 100 pages
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Chart Number One is essential to correct and accurate use of nautical charts. More than a chart, it is a book that defines the symbols, abbreviations and terms used on charts. It also provides important information about buoys, light visibility (range) and aids to navigation.
This new and improved edition from Paradise Cay is a complete and accurate high quality reproduction of information provided by NOAA and NIMA. It retails at only $9.95. The Government Edition, last published in November 1997, is no longer available.
  

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Contents

A Chart Number Title Marginal Notes
10
B Positions Distances Directions Compass
12
C Natural Features
16
D Cultural Features
21
E Landmarks
24
F Ports
28
G Topographic Terms
32
H Tides Currents
35
M Tracks Routes
52
N Areas Limits
57
O Hydrographic Terms
62
P Lights
63
Q Buoys Beacons
70
R Fog Signals
78
S Radar Radio Electronic Position Fixing Systems
80
T Services
83

I Depths
39
J Nature of the Seabed
42
K Rocks Wrecks Obstructions
45
L Offshore Installations
49
U Small Craft Facilities
85
V Index of Abbreviations
87
W International Abbreviations
93
X List of Descriptors
95

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 8 - The aids to navigation depicted on charts comprise a system consisting of fixed and floating aids with varying degrees of reliability. Therefore, prudent mariners will not rely solely on any single aid to navigation, particularly a floating aid. The buoy symbol is used to indicate the approximate position of the buoy body and the sinker which secures the buoy to the seabed. The approximate position is used because of practical limitations in positioning and maintaining buoys and their sinkers in...
Page 8 - For the foregoing reasons, mariners should not rely completely upon the position or operation of floating aids to navigation, but should also utilize bearings from fixed objects and aids to navigation on shore.
Page 6 - Shoreline shown on charts represents the line of contact between the land and a selected water elevation. In areas affected by tidal fluctuation, this line of contact is usually the mean high-water line.
Page 8 - The position of the buoy body can be expected to shift inside and outside the charting symbol due to the forces of nature. The mariner is also cautioned that buoys are liable to be carried away, shifted, capsized, sunk, etc. Lighted buoys may be extinguished or sound signals may not function as a result of ice, running ice or other natural causes, collisions, or other accidents.
Page 8 - US Coast Pilots, Sailing Directions, Light Lists, Radio Aids, and related publications furnish information required by the navigator that cannot be shown conveniently on the nautical chart. US Nautical Chart Catalogs and Indexes list nautical charts, auxiliary maps, and related publications, and include general information (marginal notes, etc.) relative to the charts. A glossary of foreign terms and abbreviations is generally given on -the charts on which they are used, as well as in the Sailing...
Page 7 - SHORELlNE is used on charts to show the outer edge of marine vegetation where that limit would reasonably appear as the shoreline to the mariner or where it prevents the shoreline from being clearly defined.
Page 8 - The approximate position is used because of practical limitations in positioning and maintaining buoys and their sinkers in precise geographical locations. These limitations include, but are not limited to, inherent imprecisions in position fixing methods, prevailing atmospheric and sea conditions, the slope of and the material making up the seabed, the fact that buoys are moored to sinkers by varying lengths of chain, and the fact that buoy...
Page 8 - ... and/or sinker positions are not under continuous surveillance but are normally checked only during periodic maintenance visits which often occur more than a year apart. The position of the buoy body can be expected to shift inside and outside the charting symbol due to the forces of nature.
Page 6 - In areas affected by tidal fluctuation, this line of contact is usually the mean high-water line. ln confined coastal waters of diminished tidal influence, a mean water level line may be used. The shoreline of interior waters (rivers, lakes) is usually a line representing a specified elevation above a selected datum. Shoreline is symbolized by a heavy line (A9).

About the author (2010)

NOAA - National Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationNIMA - National Imagery and Mapping Agency

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