The State and Justice: An Essay in Political Theory

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 24, 1989 - Law - 391 pages
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Offering a new political theory combining elements from the Marxist and liberal traditions, this book presents a disturbing view of the contemporary state at war with itself. This internal conflict stems from the state's having the double task of spurring on the economy and protecting the welfare and rights of all its citizens. Such conflict does not end at national boundaries but extends through the system of any imperial state. This perspective illuminates the fractures and instability within the imperial system.
  

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Contents

Can the state rule without justice?
1
An outline of a materialist political theory
15
A challenge to materialism
16
A framework for the state
29
The revolt against theory
39
State autonomy
50
An assessment of the place of justice in the state
65
Ideal justice
67
Democracy its bright and its dark sides
166
Welfare capitalism
180
The new mercantilism
193
Organized labor and the state
204
An account of the community of states
219
Global justice
221
The imperial state
233
Peace through strength
246

Property and justice
80
Repression and radical justice
92
Justice and materialism
104
Equality and liberty
115
Class and the limits of control
127
A functional view of political institutions
139
On functional explanation
141
Power and function
154
The Soviet Union as other
259
A reflection on the transition to a new kind
273
Revolutionary anarchism
289
The socialist state
315
State class and democracy
329
Index
381
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