Naples: Political, Social, and Religious, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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T. C. Newby, 1856 - Naples (Italy)
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Page 24 - Such talking, shouting, and rushing to and fro, indeed, can scarcely be found anywhere else. It has been said with an appearance of truth that the Neapolitans talk all day long and for half the night. " The rumble of carts and carriages of every description which, with the greatest velocity and frightful shouts, cut through the crowds of people every moment, the running, struggling, pushing, and fighting, form the most extraordinary picture that can be seen in Europe. It has been computed that, at...
Page 25 - ... cartmen, muleteers, and pedestrians, all contributing to the incessant din ; some swearing, some screaming, some singing, some holding forth on the new opera, others on the last lottery, and all talking even more with their hands than with their tongues. Amidst this throng of passengers, everything which can be done under the open canopy of heaven is going forward in this busy street. The shoemaker, the tailor, and the joiner are all there at work ; the writer sits at his desk, and his employers...
Page 25 - ... threatening perdition to all who neglect to give him alms ; farther on, a decrepit old woman is screaming out a hymn, as a penance, whilst her voice is drowned in that of a quack doctor, recommending his wares. Jugglers play their tricks, gamblers shout out the number of the game they are playing, females are stuffing mattresses, cleaning vegetables, plucking poultry, and scouring pans, all in the open way.
Page 24 - ... form the most extraordinary picture that can be seen in Europe. It has been computed that, at every moment of the day, more than fifty thousand persons may be found in the Toledo, with above fifteen hundred vehicles of various kinds; coachmen, cartmen, muleteers, and pedestrians all contributing to the incessant din; some swearing, some screaming, some singing, some holding forth on the new opera, others on the last lottery, and all talking even more with their hands than with their tongues....
Page 253 - ... image. When this is again uncovered on the following year, by the same personage, it is invariably found that the hair has grown again to its former length ! and on the announcement of the miracle, a hundred cannon from the different fortresses of the city proclaim it to the delighted people, whilst fire-works of every description are let off by the pious before the gates of the church. The old miracle of the liquefaction of the blood of St.
Page 253 - Maria del Carmine, near the market-place, rendered famous by the revolt of Massaniello. In this sacred building is an image of the Crucifixion, which is usually covered, so as to conceal it from the eyes of the vulgar. On this day alone the veil is removed by the archbishop in the presence of the...
Page 255 - Murat with all despatch, sent half-a-dozen cannon to be planted against the cathedral, and at the same time caused an intimation to be given to the priests who were there officiating, that if the blood of St. Gennaro did not immediately melt as usual, in less than five minutes the whole building should be brought...
Page 237 - Ever}- farthing she could earn, every crust she could spare from her scanty meals, she carried daily to him; and when the chained convicts, returning from their labour, were marched two and two towards their prison, she was ever waiting by the wayside to give her scanty savings to the half-famished convict. We are no sentimental sympathizers with crime, hut the story of this young man deeply moved our compassion.
Page 29 - ... pocket; whilst the other, a few paces behind, followed him to keep watch. Only a short time elapsed, ere a thief commenced his operations ; but scarcely had he secured the prize, ere the second gentleman rushed forward, and seized him by the collar. The next instant a knife was plunged in the body of the American by another of the gang, who with, the prisoner, readily effected his escape, whilst the stranger fell dead to the ground. I have heard that this story is contradicted...
Page 75 - ... had probably never enjoyed the advantage of water or of brush, the whole scene was so novel, so pictorial, and, to a fanciful mind, so romantic, that we would not have exchanged that rustic repast and our peasant attendants for all the luxuries of a court. A new pleasure awaited us when our meal was over, and we went out on the terrace and gazed over the blue mountains that skirt the Mediterranean, beyond...

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