Women in Early America: Struggle, Survival, and Freedom in a New World (Google eBook)

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ABC-CLIO, Jan 1, 2004 - History - 495 pages
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"They farmed the land and educated children. They kept taverns and ran printing presses. They built lives in hostile environments and enabled settlements to flourish. They smoked and drank and had premarital sex. These were the women of colonial America. Women in Early America: Struggle, Survival, and Freedom in a New World is the fist book to focus on the lives of these fascinating women." "Women in Early America examines a unique period in American history when women had immense responsibilities and unusual freedoms. As it explores their struggles for survival and the myriad ways in which they influenced American culture and society, the work answers such intriguing questions as: What sports did women participate in? Were they ever forced to wear a "scarlet letter"? and How did women cope with rural isolation in an untamed wilderness?"--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  

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Contents

A
1
B
43
C
61
D
97
E
127
F
137
G
157
H
173
P
295
Q
321
R
327
S
339
T
389
V
409
W
411
Y
433

I
195
J
217
K
223
L
227
M
243
N
289
O
293
Appendix I Household Chores Common to Early American Women
435
Appendix II Documents
441
Bibliography
455
Index
471
About the Author
495
Copyright

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Page 3 - I long to hear that you have declared an independency and by the way, in the new Code of Laws which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make, I desire you would Remember the Ladies, and be more generous and favourable to them than your ancestors.
Page 3 - I long to hear that you have declared an independancy and by the way in the new Code of Laws which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make I desire you would Remember the Ladies, and be more generous and favourable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the Husbands. Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could.

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About the author (2004)

Dorothy A. Mays is assistant professor and librarian at Rollins College, Winter Park, FL, specializing in the history of the early modern period.

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