Community organizing and development

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Pearson/Allyn & Bacon, 2008 - Business & Economics - 468 pages
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This revised edition of a well-known and widely used text in community organizing and development fully examines the broad and changing political and social settings that influence actions; while portraying the infra-structure of social change -- the knowledge, personnel, and organizations -- that enable such work to be successfully accomplished. The text brings together the practicalities of organizing and development -- fund raising, working out news releases, running an organization, orchestrating political actions, academic knowledge -- and explains why various approaches work; as well as the values and ideologies that guide what is to be done. It provides the foundations of organizing and development work and then describes how activists -- through following either a social confrontation model or an economic and social production approach -- can respond to economic and social problems.

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Contents

A World of Hope
19
PART TWO The Three Pillars of Progressive
59
Building Community to Create Capacity for Change
75
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Herbert J. Rubin is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at Northern Illinois University. He is the author of Applied Social Research and (with Irene Rubin) four editions of Community Organizing and Development. He has written articles based on in-depth interviewing that explore rural development in Thailand, suburban land-use fights, cooperative housing and economic and community development. Both his monograph on Thailand, The Dynamics of Development in Rural Development and his book on community renewal in the United States, Renewing Hope within Neighborhoods of Despair: The Community-based Development Model, are based on participant observation and hundreds of in-depth interviews. He is currently using open ended in depth interviews as well as participant observation to study organizations that advocate for the poor.