The Works of John Ruskin, Volumes 2-3 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Wiley, 1885
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Contents

Ultimate conclusions universal
22
What duty is attached to this power over impressions of sense
23
Errors induced by the power of habit
24
The large scope of matured judgment
25
The danger of a spirit of choice
26
And criminality
27
With what liabilities to error
28
The term beauty how limitable in the outset Divided into typical and vital
29
Of False Opinions held concerning Beauty 1 Of the false opinion that truth is beauty and vice versa
30
xii 5
31
Bat never either creates or destroys the essence of beauty
32
Of the false opinion that beauty depends on the association of ideas
33
Association accidental The extent of its influence
34
The dignity of its function
35
First of Infinity or the Type of Divine Incomprehensibility 1 Impossibility of adequately treating the Bubject
38
With wbat simplicity of feeling to be approached 88
40
Infinity how necessary in art
41
Conditions of its necessity
42
How the dignity of treatment is proportioned to the expres sion of infinity
43
Examples among the Southern schools
44
Among the painters of landscape
45
The beauty of curvature
46
The beauty of gradation
47
How necessary in Art
48
Infinity not rightly implied by vastness
49
Of Unity or the Type of the Divine Compre hensiveness 1 The general conception of divine Unity
50
The several kinds of unity Subjectional Original Of sequence and of membership
51
Unity of membership How secured
52
Variety Why required
53
Change and its influence on beauty
54
The love of change How morbid and evil
55
And towards unity of sequence
57
The value of apparent proportion in curvature
60
How by nature obtained CI
61
Error of Burke in this matter
62
Constructive proportion Its influence in plants
63
And animals
64
Of Symmetry or the Type of Divine Justice
72
Of Moderation or the Type of Government
81
How it is connected with impressions of beauty
86
First as Relative
89
plants
92
This sympathy is unselfish and does not regard utility
93
Especially with respect to animals
94
And it is destroyed by evidences of mechanism
95
The second perfection of the theoretic faculty as concerned with life is justice of moral judgment
96
How impeded
97
As also in plants
99
Recapitulation
100
Secondly as Generic 1 The beauty of fulfilment of appointed function in every animal
101
The two senses of the word ideal Either it refers to ac tion of the imagination
102
Or to perfection of type
103
Of Ideal form First in the lower animals
104
Ideal form in vegetables
105
Admits of variety in the ideal of the former
106
Ideal form in vegetables destroyed by cultivation
107
Instance in the Soldanella and Ranunculus
108
The ideality of Art
109
Ideality how belonging to ages and conditions
110
What room here for idealization Ill 3 How the conception of the bodily ideal is reached
112
Modifications of the bodily ideal owing to influence of mind First of intellect
113
What beauty is bestowed by them
115
A partial examination only of tbe imagination is to be at tempted
143
This instance nugatory
144
Various instances
145
The three operations of the imagination Penetrative associ ative contemplative
146
Of Imagination Associative 1 Of simple conception
147
How connected with verbal knowledge
148
Characteristics of composition
149
What powers are implied by it The first of the three func tions of fancy
150
Imagination is the correlative conception of imperfect compo nent parts
151
The grasp and dignity of imagination
152
Its limits
153
How manifested in treatment of uncertain relations Its de ficiency illustrated
154
Laws of art the safeguard of the unimaginative
155
The monotony of unimaginative treatment
156
Imagination never repeats itself
157
Modification of its manifestation
158
Its presence Salvator Nicolo Poussin Titian Tintoret
159
And Turner
160
The due function of Associative imagination with respect to nature
161
Of Imagination Penetrative
163
The imagination seizes always by the innermost point
164
It acts intuitively and without reasoning
165
Absence of imagination how shown
166
Fancy how involved with imagination
168
Fancy is never serious 109
169
Imagination is quiet fancy restless
170
By Tintoret
182
The imaginative verity how distinguished from realism
183
The imagination how manifested in sculpture
184
Michael Angelo
185
Recapitulation The perfect function of the imagination is the intuitive perception of ultimate truth
188
Imagination how vulgarly understood
190
On independence of mind
191
Of Imagination Contemplative 1 Imagination contemplative is not part of the essence but only a habit or mode of the faculty
192
Is not in itself capable of adding to the charm of fair things
193
But gives to the imagination its regardant power over them
194
The third office of fancy distinguished from imagination con templative
195
Various instances
197
Morbid or nervous fancy
200
The action of contemplative imagination is not to be expressed by art
201
Of color without form
202
Or of both without texture
203
Either when it is symbolically used
204
Or in architectural decoration 205
205
Exception in delicate and superimposed ornament
207
Exaggeration Its laws and limits First in scale of repre sentation
208
Secondly of things capable of variety of scale
210
Of the Superhuman Ideal 1 The subject is not to be here treated in detail
212
And these are in or through creature forms familiar to us
213
1st Of the expression of inspiration
214
No representation of that which is more than creature is pos sible
215
Supernatural character expressed by modification of acces sories
216
Landscape of the religious painters Its character is emi nently symmetrical
217
Landscape of Perugino and Raffaelle
218
Color and Decoration Their use in representations of the Supernatural
219
Decoration so used must be generic
220
Ideal form of the body itself of what variety susceptible
221
Symmetry How valuable
222
Its scope how limited
224
Addenda
225
Universal feeling respecting the necessity of repose in art
1
The inconsistency among the effects of the mental virtues
8
Except under narrow limits 1st Abstract rendering
9
The effects of the Adamite corse are to be distinguished from
11
And what caution it renders necessary in the examination
12
How the lower pleasures may be elevated in rank 16
16
Of Realization 18
18
III Of the Real Nature of Greatness of Style 23
23
the form 116
32
them 36
36
First Religious 44
44
sources 60
60
Secondly Profane CI
61
First Purist
70
Secondly Naturalist 77
77
Thirdly Grotesque 93
93
form without color 201
99
IX Of Finish 108
108
Is a sign of Gods kind purpose towards the race 116
116
Consequent separation and difference of ideals 117
117
signs of its immediate activity 118
118
Ideal form is only to be obtained by portraiture 119
119
Evil results of opposite practice in modern times 120
120
The right use of the model 121
121
Practical principles deducible 122
122
Portraiture ancient and modern 123
123
How connectedwith impurity of color 124
124
Or by severity of drawing 125
125
And modern art 126
126
Holy fear how distinct from human terror 127
127
Such expressions how sought by painters powerless and
128
Of passion generally 129
129
It is never to be for itself exhibitedat least on the face 130
130
Recapitulation 131
131
There are no sources of the emotion of beauty more than those found in things visible 133
133
What imperfection exists in visible things How in a sort by imagination removable 134
134
What objections may be made to this conclusion 135
135
How interrupted by false feeling 136
136
Greatness and truth are sometimes by the Deity sustained and spoken in and through evil men 137
137
The second objection arising from the coldness of Christian men to external beauty 138
138
Reasons for this coldness in the anxieties of the world These anxieties overwrought and criminal 139
139
Evil consequences of such coldness 140
140
XI Of the Novelty of Landscape 144
145
Of the Pathetic Fallacy 153
153
but apprehending of things 163
163
Of Classical Landscape 108
168
First the Fields 191
191
Secondly the Rocks 229
229
Of Modern Landscape
248
XVII The Moral of Landscape
280
XVIII Of the Teachers of Turner 808
308
Claudes Treedrawing
333
German Philosophy
336
IIIPlagiarism 838
338

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Page 37 - From God who is our home. Heaven lies about us in our infancy. Shades of the prison-house begin to close Upon the growing boy; But he beholds the light and whence it flows, He sees it in his joy. The youth who daily farther from the East Must travel, still is Nature's priest, And, by the vision splendid, Is on his way attended. At length the man perceives it die away And fade into the light of common day.
Page 143 - And missing thee, I walk unseen On the dry smooth-shaven green. To behold the wandering moon, Riding near her highest noon. Like one that had been led astray Through the heaven's wide pathless way, And oft, as if her head she bowed, Stooping through a fleecy cloud.
Page 288 - Fear and trembling Hope, Silence and Foresight ; Death the Skeleton And Time the Shadow ; there to celebrate, As in a natural temple scattered o'er With altars undisturbed of mossy stone, United worship ; or in mute repose To lie, and listen to the mountain flood Murmuring from Glaramara's inmost caves, 1803.
Page 165 - Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar?
Page 82 - That which doth assign unto each thing the kind, that which doth moderate the force and power, that which doth appoint the form and measure, of working, the same we term a law.
Page 195 - Inaudible as dreams ! the thin blue flame Lies on my low-burnt fire, and quivers not ; Only that film, which fluttered on the grate, Still flutters there, the sole unquiet thing. Methinks its motion in this hush of Nature Gives it dim sympathies with me who live, Making it a companionable form, Whose puny flaps and freaks the idling Spirit By its own moods interprets, everywhere Echo or mirror seeking of itself, And makes a toy of Thought.
Page 90 - It doth not love the shower, nor seek the cold : This neither is its courage nor its choice, But its necessity in being old. " The sunshine may not cheer it, nor the dew ; It cannot help itself in its decay ; Stiff in its members, withered, changed of hue.
Page 167 - Who is she that looketh forth as the morning, fair as the moon, clear as the sun, and terrible as an army with banners?
Page 202 - The sun came dazzling thro' the leaves, And flamed upon the brazen greaves Of bold Sir Lancelot. A red-cross knight for ever kneel'd To a lady in his shield, That sparkled on the yellow field, Beside remote Shalott.
Page 9 - I look for ghosts ; but none will force Their way to me : 'tis falsely said That there was ever intercourse Between the living and the dead ; For, surely, then I should have sight Of him I wait for day and night, With love and longings infinite.

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