Journals of the Continental Congress, Volume 6 (Google eBook)

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1906 - United States
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Page 1094 - Prudence, indeed, will dictate that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes ; and accordingly all experience hath shewn that mankind are more disposed to suffer while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
Page 1095 - He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions to cause others to be elected ; whereby the Legislative Powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise ; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.
Page 1097 - Nor have we been wanting in attentions to our British Brethren We have warned them...
Page 1098 - All charges of war and all other expenses that shall be incurred for the common defence or general welfare, and allowed by the United States in congress assembled, shall be defrayed out of a common treasury, which shall be supplied by the several states...
Page 1095 - He has affected to render the military independent of, and superior to the civil power. He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitutions and unacknowledged by our laws, giving his assent to their acts of pretended legislation...
Page 1093 - The clause too, reprobating the enslaving the inhabitants of Africa, was struck out in complaisance to South Carolina and Georgia, who had never attempted to restrain the importation of slaves, and who, on the contrary, still wished to continue it.
Page 1096 - He has excited domestic insurrections among us, and has endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers the merciless Indian savages, whose known rule of warfare is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.
Page 1091 - It appearing in the course of these debates, that the colonies of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and South Carolina were not yet matured for falling from the parent stem, but that they were fast advancing to that state...
Page 1087 - Congress should declare that these United Colonies are and of right ought to be free and independent states; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the state of Great Britain is and ought to be totally dissolved; that measures should be immediately taken for procuring the assistance of foreign powers, and a confederation be formed to bind the colonies more closely together.
Page 1117 - An Oration in Memory of General Montgomery, and of the Officers and Soldiers -who fell with him, December 31, 1775, before Quebec; drawn up (and delivered February iqth, 7776). At the Desire of the Honorable Continental Congress.

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