Every Man a King Or Might in Mind-Mastery (Google eBook)

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Cosimo, Inc., Mar 1, 2007 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 252 pages
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How can we cultivate the power of positive thinking? The question has dogged us since Orison Swett Marden-the preeminent self-help expert of the early 20th century and a forerunner of Dale Carnegie and Norman Vincent Peale, Stephen R. Covey and Anthony Robbins-first revealed the impact our state of mind has over own success. In this book, first published in 1906, Marden explains: . How our thoughts radiate as influence. How mind rules the body. Why our worst enemy is fear. How to master our moods. Why affirmation creates power. And much more.American writer and editor ORISON SWETT MARDEN (1850-1924) was born in New England and studied at Boston University and Andover Theological Seminary. In 1897, he founded Success Magazine.
  

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Contents

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Page 17 - My experiments show that irascible, malevolent, and depressing emotions generate in the system injurious compounds, some of which are extremely poisonous ; also, that agreeable, happy emotions generate chemical compounds of nutritious value, which stimulate the cells to manufacture energy.
Page 24 - O Benvenuto! your statue is spoiled, and there is no hope whatever of saving it." No sooner had I heard the shriek of that wretch than I gave a howl which might have been heard from the sphere of flame. Jumping from my bed, I seized my clothes and began to dress.
Page 21 - ... into his face, and extend their examination over his whole body, beginning with the fingers of each hand. I was surprised at this, and the reason was thus explained to me: Every volition and thought of man is inscribed on his brain; for volition and thought have their beginnings in the brain, thence they are conveyed to the bodily members, wherein they terminate.
Page 26 - I have seen scurvy enough to know every old scar in his body a running ulcer. I never saw a case so bad that either lived or died. Men die of it, usually, long before they are as ill as he was. There was trouble aboard. There might be mutiny so soon as the breath was out of his body. We might be at each others' throats. I felt that he owed the repose of dying to the service. I went down to his bunk, and shouted in his ear, " Mutiny! Captain! Mutiny! " He shook off the cadaverous stupor. " Set...

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