Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Age of the Internet: New Essays (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Karen Hellekson, Kristina Busse
McFarland, Jul 5, 2006 - Literary Criticism - 296 pages
5 Reviews
Fans have been responding to literary works since the days of Homer's Odyssey and Euripedes' Medea. More recently, a number of science fiction, fantasy, media, and game works have found devoted fan followings. The advent of the Internet has brought these groups from relatively limited, face-to-face enterprises to easily accessible global communities, within which fan texts proliferate and are widely read and even more widely commented upon. New interactions between readers and writers of fan texts are possible in these new virtual communities. From Star Trek to Harry Potter, the essays in this volume explore the world of fan fiction--its purposes, how it is created, how the fan experiences it. Grouped by subject matter, essays cover topics such as genre intersection, sexual relationships between characters, character construction through narrative, and the role of the beta reader in online communities. The work also discusses the terminology used by creators of fan artifacts and comments on the effects of technological advancements on fan communities.
  

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Review: Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Age of the Internet: New Essays

User Review  - vylit - Goodreads

I think this is the best book of scholarship on current fan communities on the market. Covering everything from homoeroticism within fandom to the history of fan communities, the book is a thorough overview of different issues within modern fan communities. Read full review

Review: Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Age of the Internet: New Essays

User Review  - Jenny - Goodreads

Interesting and informative collection of academic-fan fiction practitioners texts that analyse different aspects of fiction and communities, such as media fandoms, fan fiction writers, slash fiction, queering fiction, female fan fiction writers, etc. Read full review

Contents

Preface
1
Work in Progress Kristina Busse and Karen Hellekson
5
A Bibliography of Critical Works
33
Francesca Coppa
41
Archontic Literature A Definition a History and Several Theories of Fan Fiction Abigail Derecho
61
One True Pairing The Romance of Pornography and the Pornography of Romance Catherine Driscoll
79
Intimatopia Genre Intersections Between Slash and the Mainstream Elizabeth Woledge
97
The Toy Soldiers from Leeds The Slash Palimpsest Mafalda Stasi
115
The Audience as Editor The Role of Beta Readers in Online Fan Fiction Communities Angelina I Karpovich
171
Cunning Linguists The Bisexual Erotics of WordsSilenceFlesh Eden Lackner Barbara Lynn Lucas and Robin Anne Reid
189
My Life Is a WIP on My LJ Slashing the Slasher and the Reality of Celebrity and Internet Performances Kristina Busse
207
Writing Bodies in Space Media Fan Fiction as Theatrical Performance Francesca Coppa
225
This Dratted Thing Fannish Storytelling Through New Media Louisa Ellen Stein
245
From Shooting Monsters to Shooting Movies Machinima and the Transformative Play of Video Game Fan Culture Robert Jones
261
Contributors
281
Index
285

Construction of Fan Fiction Character Through Narrative Deborah Kaplan
134
Keeping Promises to Queer Children Making Space for Mary Sue at Hogwarts Ika Willis
153

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About the author (2006)

Karen Hellekson is a freelance copy editor and independent scholar. She writes book reviews for Publishers Weekly and lives in Jay, Maine. Kristina Busse teaches in the Department of Philosophy at the University of South Alabama and has published a variety of essays on fan fiction and fan culture. She is the founding coeditor of Transformative Works and Cultures.

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