An Address Delivered at the Request of the Citizens of Hartford, on the 9th of November, 1835: The Close of the Second Century, from the First Settlement of the City (Google eBook)

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Belknap & Hamersley, 1835 - Hartford (Conn.) - 80 pages
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Page 46 - It being one chief project of that old deluder, Satan, to keep men from the knowledge of the Scriptures, as in former times by keeping them in an unknown tongue, so in these latter times by persuading from the use of tongues...
Page 46 - ... to the end that learning may not be buried in the graves of our forefathers in church and commonwealth, the Lord assisting our endeavors.
Page 48 - After God had carried us safe to New England, and we had builded our houses, provided necessaries for our livelihood, reared convenient places for God's worship, and settled the civil government, one of the next things we longed for and looked after was to advance learning and perpetuate it to posterity; dreading to leave an illiterate ministry to the churches, when our present ministers shall lie in the dust.
Page 20 - Thus out of small beginnings greater things have been produced by His hand that made all things of nothing, and gives being to all things that are ; and as one small candle may light a thousand, so the light here kindled hath shone to many, yea in some sort to our whole nation; let the glorious name of Jehovah have all the praise.
Page 48 - Civil Government: One of the next things we longed for, and looked after was to advance Learning and perpetuate it to Posterity; dreading to leave an illiterate Ministry to the Churches when our present Ministers shall lie in the Dust.
Page 74 - The commissioners were authorised to support the clergy by assigning them "tithes, oblations, and other profits, according to their discretion; to inflict punishment on those who should violate their ordinances; to remove governors of plantations, and to appoint others; and to constitute tribunals...
Page 62 - Say not thou, What is the cause that the former days were better than these? for thou dost not inquire wisely concerning this.
Page 53 - So absolute indeed was the authority of the crown, that the precious spark of liberty had been kindled, and was preserved by the puritans alone ; and it was to this sect, whose principles appear so frivolous and habits so ridiculous, that the English owe the whole freedom of their constitution.
Page 77 - The first thing which was printed was the freeman's oath; the next was an almanack made for New England by Mr. William Pierce Mariner; the next was the Psalms newly turned into metre.
Page 49 - Hopkins, which is to give some encouragement in those foreign plantations for the breeding up of hopeful youths in a way of learning, both at the grammar school and college, for the public service of the country in future times.

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