The speeches of John Wilkes ... in the Parliament appointed to meet at Westminster the 29. day of November 1774, to the prorogation the 6. day of June 1777, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Page 64 - That an humble Addrefs be prefented to His Majefty, to return His Majefty the thanks of this Houfe, for His moft gracious Speech from the Throne.
Page 105 - When the bill is brought in, and sent to a committee, it will be the proper time to examine all the minutiae of this great plan, and to determine on the propriety of what ought now to be done, as well as of what formerly was actually accomplished.
Page 42 - Esq. to be elected a member to serve in the said parliament, be expunged from the journals of this house, as being subversive of the rights <of the whole body of electors of this kingdom.
Page 15 - If gentlemen will search the records in the Tower, and the chapel of the Rolls, they will find that the town of Calais, in France, when it belonged to the imperial crown of this realm, was not taxed till it sent a representative to parliament.
Page 77 - Brunfwick, whom he was by his commiffion and inftructions diredted to obey as commander in chief, according to the rules of war, and it is the farther opinion of this court, that the faid Lord George Sackville is, and he is hereby adjudged, unfit to ferve his majefty in any military capacity whatfoever.
Page 97 - ... if they are not self-created, self-elected, self-existent, of this pretended right being transferred to the county, while the rich and populous manufacturing towns of Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds, Sheffield, and others, may have at least an equitable share in the formation of those laws by which they are governed.
Page 80 - The Americans, Sir, are a pious and religious people. With much ardour and fuccefs they follow the firft great command of Heaven, Be fruitful and multiply.
Page 141 - the Catholic king had, at no time, been more " intent upon cultivating a good correfpondence with " England, than in the prefent conjuncture.
Page 50 - People, the King, and the Lords. The two last tamely acquiesced in the exercise of a power, which had been in a great instance fatal to their predecessors, had put an end to their very existence; but the people, sir, and in particular the spirited freeholders of this county, whose ruling passion is the love of liberty, have not yet forgiven the attack on their rights. So dangerous a precedent, of...
Page 13 - Aft, [paffed in 1766] it is well known, declares, That " this kingdom has power, " and of right ought to have power to make laws and ." ftatutes to bind the colonies, and people of America,

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