The Right to Vote: The Contested History of Democracy in the United States (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Basic Books, 2009 - History - 467 pages
5 Reviews
Originally published in 2000, The Right to Vote was widely hailed as a magisterial account of the evolution of suffrage from the American Revolution to the end of the twentieth century. In this revised and updated edition, Keyssar carries the story forward, from the disputed presidential contest of 2000 through the 2008 campaign and the election of Barack Obama. The Right to Vote is a sweeping reinterpretation of American political history as well as a meditation on the meaning of democracy in contemporary American life.
  

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Review: The Right To Vote The Contested History Of Democracy In The United States

User Review  - Scott Caplan - Goodreads

Parts of it were assigned for a voting rights seminar senior year. I quite enjoyed those parts, and the topic, so I'd like to get around to reading the whole thing (though Gordon Wood will come first). Read full review

Review: The Right To Vote The Contested History Of Democracy In The United States

User Review  - Lily - Goodreads

Such an interesting book on a really interesting topic. My favorite of the books we've read so far for American Political History. Read full review

Contents

PART I
1
VIII
11
Democracy Ascendant
22
4
24
Sources of Expansion
28
Ideas and flrguments
35
Backsliding and Sideslipping
43
Paupers Felons and Migrants
49
Breaking Barriers
205
94
244
The Story Unfinished
258
The Project of Democracy
295
State Sujrage Laws 1 7751920
303
flppendix Sources
369
Notes
381
139
384

The War in Rhode Island
56
PART II
61
The Qliet Years
180

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About the author (2009)

Alexander Keyssar is the Matthew W. Stirling, Jr., Professor of History and Social Policy at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. His 1986 book, Out of Work, was awarded three scholarly prizes, and his book, The Right to Vote, was named the best book in U.S. history by both the American Historical Association and the Historical Society; it was also a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the Los Angeles Times Book Award. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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