The Sound Shape of Language

Front Cover
Walter de Gruyter, Jan 1, 2002 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 335 pages
1 Review
"Reading this volume transported me back to Harvard and MIT lecture halls of the 1960s, where weekly Roman Jakobson would spellbind his audience (this reviewer included), developing his vision of language through impassioned exposition, deft and devastating allusions to critical literature, anecdotes with the force of parables, metaphors of mythic imagery, and above all else overriding verbal artistry: truly in his own phrase, 'In the poetry of grammar'. The Sound Shape of Language, his collaboration with Linda R. Waugh, a scholar who has devoted considerable attention to an exposition and elaboration of Jakobsonian views, fortunately has preserved in print the authoritative lectorial voice." Michael Silverstein in Journal of Communication
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This is such a great book for people who want a wide-reaching approach to phonology that is based on a life-time of observations grounded in reality. The theory behind Jakobson's work draws from psychology, physics, literature, semiotics and many other fields and avoids the insularity and formalisms that make currently popular approaches to sound so extreme and disconnected from the real world. This is a difficult book to read and for an introduction to Jakobson I recommend Linda Waugh's edited volume "On Language" to provide a more easily digested framework before starting Sound Shape. I work in research for industry and government and I use ideas from both this work and On Language very frequently in writing proposals and developing approaches to speech research. Great ideas whose time has yet to come.
-Aaron Lawson, SRI International
 

Contents

PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION Linda R Waugh
1
Chapter
4
Speech Sounds and Their Tasks
7
Sense Discrimination
8
Homonymy
9
Doublets
12
Early Search
13
Invariance and Relativity
17
Production and Decoding
98
CompactDiffuse
101
Sharpness and Flatness
113
Interrelation of Tonality Features
119
And What Now?
123
Chapter Three The Network of Distinctive Features
125
TheTwoAxes
128
Nasality
134

Quest for Oppositions
22
Features and Phonemes
29
Speech Sounds and the Brain
32
Redundancy
39
Configurative Features
41
Stylistic Variations
43
Physiognomic Indices
45
The Distinctive Features in Relation to the Other Components of the Speech Sound
46
The Identification of Distinctive Features
53
Sense Discrimination and Sense Determination
57
Autonomy and Integration
59
Universals
60
Speech Perception
64
Life and Language
67
Role of Learning
73
Speech and Visualized Language
74
Multiformity and Conformism
77
Inner Speech
81
Chapter Two Quest for the Ultimate Constituents
83
Vowel Consonant
87
Syllabicity
89
Markedness
92
Grave Acute
95
Voiced Voiceless and Tense Lax
138
Strident Mellow
142
Consonantal Correspondences to the Prosodic Features
145
Vowel Harmony
149
Glides
153
The Nascent Sound Shape
156
Dynamic Synchrony
168
Vistas
176
Chapter Four The Spell of Speech Sounds
181
Synesthesia
191
Word Affinities
198
SoundSymbolic Ablaut
203
Speech Sounds in Mythopoeic Usage
208
Verbal Taboo
211
Glossolalia
214
Sound as the Basis of Verse
218
AFTERWORD
235
APPENDIX
241
APPENDIX
255
REFERENCES
273
INDEX OF NAMES
317
INDEX OF LANGUAGES
325
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2002)

Roman Jakobson (1896-1982) was at the time of his death Professor Emeritus at Harvard University and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Bibliographic information