The Nazi War on Cancer

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Princeton University Press, 2000 - History - 380 pages
3 Reviews

Collaboration in the Holocaust. Murderous and torturous medical experiments. The "euthanasia" of hundreds of thousands of people with mental or physical disabilities. Widespread sterilization of "the unfit." Nazi doctors committed these and countless other atrocities as part of Hitler's warped quest to create a German master race. Robert Proctor recently made the explosive discovery, however, that Nazi Germany was also decades ahead of other countries in promoting health reforms that we today regard as progressive and socially responsible. Most startling, Nazi scientists were the first to definitively link lung cancer and cigarette smoking. Proctor explores the controversial and troubling questions that such findings raise: Were the Nazis more complex morally than we thought? Can good science come from an evil regime? What might this reveal about health activism in our own society? Proctor argues that we must view Hitler's Germany more subtly than we have in the past. But he also concludes that the Nazis' forward-looking health activism ultimately came from the same twisted root as their medical crimes: the ideal of a sanitary racial utopia reserved exclusively for pure and healthy Germans.

Author of an earlier groundbreaking work on Nazi medical horrors, Proctor began this book after discovering documents showing that the Nazis conducted the most aggressive antismoking campaign in modern history. Further research revealed that Hitler's government passed a wide range of public health measures, including restrictions on asbestos, radiation, pesticides, and food dyes. Nazi health officials introduced strict occupational health and safety standards, and promoted such foods as whole-grain bread and soybeans. These policies went hand in hand with health propaganda that, for example, idealized the Führer's body and his nonsmoking, vegetarian lifestyle. Proctor shows that cancer also became an important social metaphor, as the Nazis portrayed Jews and other "enemies of the Volk" as tumors that must be eliminated from the German body politic.

This is a disturbing and profoundly important book. It is only by appreciating the connections between the "normal" and the "monstrous" aspects of Nazi science and policy, Proctor reveals, that we can fully understand not just the horror of fascism, but also its deep and seductive appeal even to otherwise right-thinking Germans.

  

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The Nazi war on cancer

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Discovering that forward-looking health restrictions (about smoking, asbestos, radiation, and diet) were mixed in with the monstrous policies of Nazi-era German medicine, Proctor investigates without ... Read full review

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Bill Gates, World Genocide Project ....
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AFAIRS PROYECT GENOCIDE - BILL GATES .....
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GENOCIDE PROJECT - REPORT TO MINISTERS LATIN AMERICAN HOLOCAUST Chavez Julio Cesar Pineda WWW.docs.google.com / open id = 0B7rdd1w6dkcSamZTX1ZNWWZmVkk
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Bill Gates, World Genocide Project ....
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WEBSITE:
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http://WWW.docs.google.com/open?id=0B7rdd1w6dkcSamZTX1ZNWWZmVkk
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Thirty-eight of the largest U.S. billionaires joined the initiative of the founder of Microsoft, Bill Gates and Warren Buffet financial guru, to donate at least half of their fortunes, which together are around 230,000 million. The founder of CNN, Ted Turner, filmmaker George Lucas and the hotelier Barron Hilton, the list
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Thirty-eight of the largest U.S. billionaires have joined the initiative of the founder of Microsoft, Bill Gates and Warren Buffet financial guru, to donate at least half of their fortunes, which together are around 230,000 million, officials said Wednesday the proposal.
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Among the tycoons who have accepted the challenge are the mayor of New York, Michael Bloomberg, and the co-founder of Oracle, Larry Ellison, and the media executive Barry Diller and CNN founder Ted Turner.
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The list also includes the likes of George Lucas, energy tycoon T. Boone Pickens, the hotelier Barron Hilton and David Rockefeller.
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Gates and Buffett, who Forbes magazine considered two of the world's richest men with a net set of 90,000 million dollars, last month launched the initiative "The Giving Pledge" ("The commitment to donate" to the to convince the country of billionaires who devote their wealth to philanthropy.
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"We just started and we've gotten a terrific response," Buffett said in a statement, owner and financial holding company Berkshire Hathaway known as the "Oracle of Omaha" for his ability to predict the performance of markets.
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In addition to asking for money, Gates and Buffet also asked who would accept his challenge exhibited in a letter the reasons why they decided to donate most of their wealth.
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Bloomberg, who made his fortune from the current financial information company that bears his name, said in his letter that philanthropy is the best investment in the future of new generations.
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"If you do something for your children and show them how much you love, the best thing you can do with difference is to support organizations that build a better world for them," he added.
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Lucas, father of the sagas of the "Star Wars" and "Indiana Jones," he said, meanwhile, that his interest as donor centers on the world of education.
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"It is the key to our survival as a species. We have to plan for our collective future, and the first step are social instruments, emotional and intellectual we provide to our children, "he said.
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The U.S. has around 400 fortunes in excess of one billion dollars, accounting for 40 percent of assets in this level that is in the world.
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If the millionaires who appear on the list of the 400 richest U.S. donate half of its net assets, could raise for charity and social over 600,000 million dollars, according to estimates by Fortune Magazine
 

Contents

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VIII
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XXXI
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About the author (2000)

Robert N. Proctor is Professor of the History of Science at Stanford University and author of "Cancer Wars, Racial Hygiene", and "The Nazi War on Cancer" He is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

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