Springer's Progress

Front Cover
Dalkey Archive Press, 1999 - Fiction - 234 pages
13 Reviews
Here comes Lucien Springer. Age: forty-seven. Still handsome though muchly vodka'd novelist, currently abashed by acute creative dysfunction. Sole preoccupation amid these artistic doldrums: pursuit of fair women. Springer is a randy incorrigible who is guided by only one inflexible precept: no protracted affairs. And thus he has slyly sustained eighteen years of marriage.

Enter, then, Jessica Cornford. Age: almost half of Lucien's. Lush of body and roguish of mind. Whereupon what begins as bawdy interlude becomes perhaps the most untidy extramarital lech in literature.

Rabelaisian yet uncannily wise, both ribald and bittersweet, Springer's Progress is that rarest of gifts, a mature love story. It is an also exuberant linguistic romp, a novel saturated with irrepressible wordplay and outrageous literary thieveries. Contemplating his own work, Lucien Springer modestly restricts his ambition to "a phrase or three worth some lonely pretty girl's midnight underlining." For the discerning reader, David Markson has contrived a hundred of them.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - piccoline - LibraryThing

This is a less experimental novel from Markson, but the intelligence still leaps from the page. It's also damn sexy. A blurb calls it Joycean. Yes, I can see that. Funny, allusive, dirty, sensual ... Read full review

Review: Springer's Progress

User Review  - Ezekiel Tyrus - Goodreads

this is a book I read and reread, one I feel can teach me to be a better writer. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
9
Section 3
18
Section 4
20
Section 5
25
Section 6
57
Section 7
58
Section 8
60
Section 17
122
Section 18
124
Section 19
134
Section 20
138
Section 21
168
Section 22
169
Section 23
171
Section 24
172

Section 9
64
Section 10
66
Section 11
70
Section 12
78
Section 13
84
Section 14
116
Section 15
118
Section 16
120
Section 25
178
Section 26
187
Section 27
193
Section 28
195
Section 29
202
Section 30
228
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1999)

David Markson was born in Albany, New York on December 20, 1927. He received an undergraduate degree from Union College and a master's degree from Columbia University. Besides being a writer, he also worked as a journalist, book editor, and periodically as a college professor at Columbia University, Long Island University, and The New School. His works include Epitaph for a Tramp; Epitaph for a Dead Beat; This Is Not a Novel; Springer's Progress; Wittgenstein's Mistress; and The Last Novel. His novel, The Ballad of Dingus Magee, was made into a film starring Frank Sinatra entitled Dirty Dingus Magee. He was found dead on June 4, 2010 at the age of 82.

Bibliographic information