Behind the Frontier: Indians in Eighteenth-Century Eastern Massachusetts

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U of Nebraska Press, 2000 - Social Science - 257 pages
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Behind the Frontier tells the story of the Indians in Massachusetts as English settlements encroached on their traditional homeland between 1675 and 1775, from King Philip?s War to the Battle of Bunker Hill. Daniel R. Mandell explores how local needs and regional conditions shaped an Indian ethnic group that transcended race, tribe, village, and clan, with a culture that incorporated new ways while maintaining a core of "Indian" customs. He examines the development of Native American communities in eastern Massachusetts, many of which survive today, and observes emerging patterns of adaptation and resistance that were played out in different settings as the American nation grew westward in the nineteenth century.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Gotten our land
8
Their proud surly behavior
24
Encouraged to a more Neighbourly and fixed habitation
48
To Live more like my Christian English neighbors
80
Great Injuries Oppressions
117
Indians and their mixt posterity
164
Collecting the scattered remains
203
Notes
209
Bibliographical Essay
239
Index
245
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About the author (2000)

Daniel R. Mandell is an assistant professor of history at Truman State University in Kirksville, Missouri.

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