What is to be done?

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Penguin Books, Aug 4, 1988 - Political Science - 261 pages
16 Reviews
A basic consideration of the conditions and problems in the formation of a vanguard, revolutionary party.

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Review: What Is to Be Done?

User Review  - Tony Schmitt - Goodreads

I was hoping for a nice bit of theory, but it was largely a polemic. I did find it interesting then as a piece of history, and to get a sense of where Lenin stood on issues of the day. The thing that ... Read full review

Review: What Is to Be Done?

User Review  - Sebastian Villegas - Goodreads

Finally, such tough, hard reading! considering that i'm pretty knowledgeable about this kind of topics, this read was terrible for me, I dont know to much about the previous social democrats ... Read full review

Contents

WHAT IS TO BE DONE?
69
The Spontaneity of the Masses and
96
TradeUnionist Politics and SocialDemocratic
120
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

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About the author (1988)

Creator of the former Soviet Union, Vladimir Ilich Lenin (family name Ulianov) was born on April 10, 1870 in Simbirsk (later Ulianovsk), Russia, the son of a schools inspector. Lenin received upper class education and obtained a law degree in 1891, but he was moved to oppose the czarist Russian government, partly due to the execution of his brother, Alexander, who had participated in a plot to assassinate the Russian emperor. For taking part in revolutionary activities, Lenin was eventually imprisoned, publishing his work, The Development of Capitalism in Russia, from prison in 1899. Three years later, his pamphlet "What Is to Be Done" became the model for Communist philosophy. Lenin helped the Bolshevist movement that overthrew the czarist government and brought an end to Russia's war against Germany. As head of the new government, he put land in the hands of the peasants and brought industry under government control. An assassination attempt in 1918 wounded him, and two strokes in 1922 forced him to severely curtail government duty. He retreated to his country home in Gorki, where he died on January 21, 1924.

Robert W. Service was born in London about 1874. He had a convoluted life that involved much moving around, from Scotland, to England, to Canada, to California. He worked in banks, was a war correspondent for the Toronto Star and an ambulance driver for the American Red Cross, and he served as an intelligence officer in the Canadian Army in World War I. In 1907, he published his first book of poetry, The Spell of the Yukon, and Other Verses This book included the well-known poem "The Shooting of Dan McGrew" and this first brought him public recognition. In 1909, he left his banker's job and began writing his first novel, The Trail of the '98. He married in 1913 and the couple had a daughter. In 1921, Service went to Hollywood to work on a film version of Dan McGrew. In later life, he devoted himself to writing and traveling and he died in Brittany, France, in 1958.

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