Virtually Normal: An Argument about Homosexuality

Front Cover
Picador, 1996 - Homosexuality - 225 pages
10 Reviews
Virtually Normal is an exploration of today's principal arguments about homosexuality, from the Catholic church to Michel Foucault. It is a book not about individual feelings but about the way society deals - or does not deal - with the homosexual minority. And, finally, it charts a new politics to lead us out of our cultural and political impasse - based not on the behaviour of the private citizen but on the activity of the state - and argues for full equality for homosexuals, especially in marriage and in the military.

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Review: Virtually Normal

User Review  - Beenish Khan - Goodreads

It might be a ground breaking book in the 90s, but today it's just irrelevant. Neither interesting, nor informative. If not for reading a book starting with V, I think I would have stayed clear of this one. Read full review

Review: Virtually Normal

User Review  - Luis Barrueto - Goodreads

A very complete outlook at homosexual politics (not understanding of homosexuality itself), but that contributes to demistify the subject. I've written about the conservative argument in particular in here: http://wp.me/pJtld-9E Read full review

About the author (1996)

Andrew Sullivan was born in southern England on August 10, 1963. He attended Magdalen College, Oxford, where he took a first in modern history and modern languages. In 1984, he won a Harkness Fellowship to Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. He interned at the Centre for Policy Studies, where he wrote a policy paper on the environment entitled Greening the Tories. He received a master's degree in public administration and a Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University. His doctoral thesis, Intimations Pursued: The Voice of Practice in the Conversation of Michael Oakeshott, won the government department prize. He was a senior editor of The New Republic, a contributor to the New York Times Magazine, and a columnist for The Sunday Times (London). He is the author of several books including Virtually Normal: An Argument About Homosexuality, Same-Sex Marriage: Pro and Con, and Love Undetectable: Notes on Friendship, Sex and Survival. He is one of the world's most widely read bloggers.

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