The Chemistry of the Actinide Elements, Volume 2

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Springer Netherlands, Oct 31, 1986 - Science - 912 pages
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The first edition of this work appeared almost thirty years ago, when, as we can see in retrospect, the study of the actinide elements was in its first bloom. Although the broad features of the chemistry of the actinide elements were by then quite well delineated, the treatment of the subject in the first edition was of necessity largely descriptive in nature. A detailed understanding of the chemical consequences of the characteristic presence of Sf electrons in most of the members of the actinide series was still for the future, and many of the systematic features of the actinide elements were only dimly apprehended. In the past thirty years all this has changed. The application of new spectroscopic techniques, which came into general use during this period, and new theoretical insights, which came from a better understanding of chemical bonding, inorganic chemistry, and solid state phenomena, were among the important factors that led to a great expansion and maturation in actinide element research and a large number of new and important findings. The first edition consisted of a serial description of the individual actinide elements, with a single chapter devoted to the six heaviest elements (lawrencium, the heaviest actinide, was yet to be discovered). Less than 15 % of the text was devoted to a consideration of the systematics of the actinide elements.

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Contents

Contributors
ix
Curium
962
Berkelium
989
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

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About the author (1986)

Born in Ishepeming, Michigan, Glenn Seaborg received a degree in chemistry from the University of California at Los Angeles. He then studied at the University of California at Berkeley, where he received a Ph.D. and taught until World War II. During the war Seaborg worked at the University of Chicago on the Manhattan Project. He was a leader of the team that discovered the transuranic elements plutonium, americium, and curium. This work led to the development of a method of separating plutonium from uranium in quantities large enough to make an atomic bomb. After World War II Seaborg continued his research on the creation of the transuranium elements. In 1951 he shared the Nobel Prize for discoveries in the chemistry of these elements with Edwin McMillan. Seaborg is codiscoverer of the elements Berkelium, Californium, Einsteinium, Fermium, Mendelevium, and Nobelium. He has spent most of his postwar professional life at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory. From 1961 to 1971 he also served as chairman of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

Lester R. Morss is the Program Manager for Heavy Element Chemistry at the Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy in Germantown, Maryland, USA. He was taught actinide chemistry fbyProfessor Burris B. Cunningham, his Ph.D. mentor at the University of California, Berkeley and from 1971 to 1980 he was a member of the chemistry faculty at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA. In 1980, Dr. Morss moved to the Argonne National Laboratory (Illinois, USA), where he remained as an actinide chemist until 2002 . At all of these institutions he carried out research in the inorganic chemistry of lanthanide and actinide elements, with a focus on transuranium elements. His publications were primarily in thermochemistry and structure-bonding relationships among metals, oxides, halides, and coordination complexes. Dr. Morss has had fellowships at the University of Liege, Belgium and at the University of Hannover, Germany (von Humboldt Senior Scientist) and he is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Norman Edelstein is an emeritus Senior Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). He started his studies in actinide chemistry with Professor Burris B. Cunningham in 1964 at LBNL (then the University of California Radiation Laboratory), USA. Following Professor Cunningham??'s untimely death in 1972 he became head of the actinide chemistry group and held that position until his assignment in 2000 and 2001 as temporary Program Manager for Heavy Element Chemistry at the Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy, Germantown, Maryland, USA. His primary research interests are the optical properties, magnetic properties, andelectronic structure of the actinides and lanthanides; the general, inorganic and solution chemistry of the actinides; and synchrotron radiation studies of actinides and other environmentally relevant materials. Dr. Edelstein has published over 200 papers on these and other topics and has edited three other volumes on actinide subjects.

Jean Fuger is Professor Emeritus at the University of Li??ge, Belgium, where he has taught courses in radiochemistry, analytical chemistry, and related subjects. In the early stages of his career, whilst associated with the Inter-University Institute for Nuclear Sciences (Brussels, Belgium), he made extensive stays at the University of California Radiation Laboratory, Berkeley, USA, with Professor Burris B. Cunningham, from whom he learned various microchemical techniques in actinide chemistry, with emphasis on preparative chemistry and microcalorimetry. From 1986 to 1997 he served as head of the chemistry division and later as deputy director of the European Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe, Germany. His research interests are centered on the structural and thermodynamic properties of the lanthanides and actinides and their compounds, as well as the solution chemistry of these elements. He published about 125 papers, and 20 monographs and book chapters on these topics.

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