An introduction to logic and scientific method

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Harcourt, Brace and company, 1934 - Philosophy - 467 pages
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An Introduction to Logic and Scientific Method is a college level primer on logic. This book was widely used by scholars especially those studying economics as an introduction to logical thought in preparation for intellectual discourse. Ludwig von Mises was known to say that all students of economics should read this book as a first step in their training as economists.

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User Review  - richardhobbs - LibraryThing

Another wonderful book on Scientic Method Read full review

Contents

THE SUBJECT MATTER OF LOGIC
3
Partial Evidence or Probable Inference
13
The Use and Application of Logic
21
Copyright

65 other sections not shown

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About the author (1934)

Morris Raphael Cohen, who taught philosophy at the City College of New York and who began life as the son of Russian-Jewish immigrants, was one of the foremost Jewish intellectuals in America during the first half of the twentieth century. He expounded a philosophy of rationalism and realism in step with contemporary science and relevant to the social issues of his times and, through his books and teaching, had a widespread influence. His book, Reason and Nature (1931), offered a clear exposition and critique of the central concepts in science and sought to demonstrate that the scientific method required rational elements (mathematics and formal logic) no less than experimental procedures that appealed to sense experience.

Ernest Nagel was John Dewey Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University.

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